DREAMer accused of brutally raping woman in Seattle suburb

A 23-year-old DREAMer in Washington state is accused of brutally raping a 19-year-old woman in her apartment complex’s gym and leaving her with severe facial injuries — including a broken jaw and dangling ear.

The woman ended up stumbling home with missing teeth, a bloody head and wearing only a black tank top, according to court documents obtained by Fox News. She was working out in the gym in Burien, a Seattle suburb, before the June 25 assault and did not know her attacker, police said.

Salvador Diaz-Garcia, an illegal immigrant who was a recipient of Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is now facing second-degree assault and rape charges in the vicious attack. He also faces child molestation charges for allegedly assaulting a 14-year-old the same day the rape occurred.

His DACA status has been revoked and he now may face possible deportation, officials said.

According to police, the woman was on the treadmill of the gym at 9:15 p.m. when Diaz-Garcia stood behind her and kept asking her questions. She asked him to move.

Diaz-Garcia then violently attacked her, police said, leaving her with a broken jaw, a broken nose and her ear partially ripped off.

PORTLAND’S SANCTUARY POLICIES TO BLAME FOR HORRIFIC RAPES, SAYS GOP LEADER

The victim told police that a month before, her attacker had groped her and then ran away. Diaz-Garcia lived in the same apartment complex as the victim, but the two had never met.

He was arrested four days after the attack when witnesses and surveillance footage allegedly captured him watching girls at the complex’s pool just before the attack. Investigators say they found what they believe is the victim’s blood on his pants. A rape kit found DNA on her.

“The state is extremely concerned for the defendant’s brazen, bold, and violent behavior towards young women,” prosecutors said in court documents.

Diaz-Garcia was granted DREAMer status in 2013 and renewed it twice since then, most recently this past January. Immigration officials said his DACA status was recently revoked.

PORTLAND MAN ACCUSED OF SEXUALLY ASSAULTING 65-YEAR-OLD HAD BEEN DEPORTED 20 TIMES

Burien passed a sanctuary law in January, but now there’s a backlash. Residents have gathered enough signatures to force a vote on if the city should continue to shield undocumented immigrants. Residents are likely to vote on the issue in November, which could be the first referendum of its kind in the U.S.

“You want to lean toward having this welcoming ‘we want everybody here to be happy and feel safe,’” said Debi Wagner, a Burien councilwoman. “How can we guarantee that if we don’t know anything about people living in our midst?”

Diaz-Garcia is being held on $350,000 bail in Kings County Jail.

Dan Springer joined Fox News Channel (FNC) in August 2001 as a Seattle-based correspondent.

Courtesy: Fox News

Trump Supports Plan to Cut Legal Immigration by Half

Photo

President Trump just before an announcement about immigration legislation with Senator Tom Cotton, second from right, and Senator David Perdue, far right, at the White House on Wednesday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Trump embraced a proposal on Wednesday to slash legal immigration to the United States in half within a decade by sharply curtailing the ability of American citizens and legal residents to bring family members into the country.

The plan would enact the most far-reaching changes to the system of legal immigration in decades and represents the president’s latest effort to stem the flow of newcomers to the United States. Since taking office, he has barred many visitors from select Muslim-majority countries, limited the influx of refugees, increased immigration arrests and pressed to build a wall along the southern border.

In asking Congress to curb legal immigration, Mr. Trump intensified a debate about national identity, economic growth, worker fairness and American values that animated his campaign last year. Critics said the proposal would undercut the fundamental vision of the United States as a haven for the poor and huddled masses, while the president and his allies said the country had taken in too many low-skilled immigrants for too long to the detriment of American workers.

“This legislation will not only restore our competitive edge in the 21st century, but it will restore the sacred bonds of trust between America and its citizens,” Mr. Trump said at a White House event alongside two Republican senators sponsoring the bill. “This legislation demonstrates our compassion for struggling American families who deserve an immigration system that puts their needs first and that puts America first.”

In throwing his weight behind a bill, Mr. Trump added one more long-odds priority to a legislative agenda already packed with them in the wake of the defeat of legislation to repeal and replace President Barack Obama’s health care program. The president has already vowed to overhaul the tax code and rebuild the nation’s roads, airports and other infrastructure.

Continue reading the main story

But by endorsing legal immigration cuts, a move he has long supported, Mr. Trump returned to a theme that has defined his short political career and excites his conservative base at a time when his poll numbers continue to sink. Just 33 percent of Americans approved of his performance in the latest Quinnipiac University survey, the lowest rating of his presidency, and down from 40 percent a month ago.

Democrats and some Republicans quickly criticized the move. “Instead of catching criminals, Trump wants to tear apart communities and punish immigrant families that are making valuable contributions to our economy,” said Tom Perez, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. “That’s not what America stands for.”

The bill, sponsored by Senators Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia, would institute a merit-based system to determine who is admitted to the country and granted legal residency green cards, favoring applicants based on skills, education and language ability rather than relations with people already here. The proposal revives an idea included in broader immigration legislation supported by President George W. Bush that died in 2007.

More than one million people are granted legal residency each year, and the proposal would reduce that by 41 percent in its first year and 50 percent by its 10th year, according to projections cited by its sponsors. The reductions would come largely from those brought in through family connections. The number of immigrants granted legal residency on the basis of job skills, about 140,000, would remain roughly the same.

Under the current system, most legal immigrants are admitted to the United States based on family ties. American citizens can sponsor spouses, parents and minor children for an unrestricted number of visas, while siblings and adult children are given preferences for a limited number of visas available to them. Legal permanent residents holding green cards can also sponsor spouses and children.

In 2014, 64 percent of immigrants admitted with legal residency were immediate relatives of American citizens or sponsored by family members. Just 15 percent entered through employment-based preferences, according to the Migration Policy Institute, an independent research organization. But that does not mean that those who came in on family ties were necessarily low skilled or uneducated.

The legislation would award points based on education, ability to speak English, high-paying job offers, age, record of achievement and entrepreneurial initiative. But while it would still allow spouses and minor children of Americans and legal residents to come in, it would eliminate preferences for other relatives, like siblings and adult children. The bill would create a renewable temporary visa for older-adult parents who come for caretaking purposes.

Video

Stephen Miller Jousts With Reporters Over Immigration

Exchanges between the senior White House adviser and Glenn Thrush of The New York Times and Jim Acosta of CNN became combative at a news briefing on Wednesday.

By THE NEW YORK TIMES on Publish DateAugust 2, 2017. Photo by Doug Mills/The New York Times. Watch in Times Video »

The legislation would limit refugees offered permanent residency to 50,000 a year and eliminate a diversity visa lottery that the sponsors said does not promote diversity. The senators said their bill was meant to emulate systems in Canada and Australia.

The projections cited by the sponsors said legal immigration would decrease to 637,960 after a year and to 539,958 after a decade.

“Our current system does not work,” Mr. Perdue said. “It keeps America from being competitive and it does not meet the needs of our economy today.”

Mr. Cotton said low-skilled immigrants pushed down wages for those who worked with their hands. “For some people, they may think that that’s a symbol of America’s virtue and generosity,” he said. “I think it’s a symbol that we’re not committed to working-class Americans, and we need to change that.”

But Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, noted that agriculture and tourism were his state’s top two industries. “If this proposal were to become law, it would be devastating to our state’s economy, which relies on this immigrant work force,” he said. “Hotels, restaurants, golf courses and farmers,” he added, “will tell you this proposal to cut legal immigration in half would put their business in peril.”

Cutting legal immigration would make it harder for Mr. Trump to reach the stronger economic growth that he has promised. Bringing in more workers, especially during a time of low unemployment, increases the size of an economy. Critics said the plan would result in labor shortages, especially in lower-wage jobs that many Americans do not want.

The National Immigration Forum, an advocacy group, said the country was already facing a work force gap of 7.5 million jobs by 2020. “Cutting legal immigration for the sake of cutting immigration would cause irreparable harm to the American worker and their family,” said Ali Noorani, the group’s executive director.

Surveys show most Americans believe legal immigration benefits the country. In a Gallup poll in January, 41 percent of Americans were satisfied with the overall level of immigration, 11 percentage points higher than the year before and the highest since the question was first asked in 2001. Still, 53 percent of Americans remained dissatisfied.

The plan endorsed by Mr. Trump generated a fiery exchange at the White House briefing when Stephen Miller, the president’s policy adviser and a longtime advocate of immigration limits, defended the proposal. Pressed for statistics to back up claims that immigration was costing Americans jobs, he cited several studies that have been debated by experts.

“But let’s also use common sense here, folks,” Mr. Miller said. “At the end of the day, why do special interests want to bring in more low-skill workers?”

He rejected the argument that immigration policy should also be based on compassion. “Maybe it’s time we had compassion for American workers,” he said.

2649COMMENTS

When a reporter read him some of the words from the Statue of Liberty — “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free” — Mr. Miller dismissed them. “The poem that you’re referring to was added later,” he said. “It’s not actually part of the original Statue of Liberty.”

He noted that in 1970, the United States allowed in only a third as many legal immigrants as it now does: “Was that violating or not violating the Statue of Liberty law of the land?”

Correction: August 2, 2017 
An earlier version of this article misstated part of President Trump’s effort to stem the flow of immigrants into the United States. He has increased immigration arrests, not deportations.

 Courtesy: The New York Times

Mike Pence in Montenegro urges Balkans to turn away from Russia

US Vice President Mike Pence advised the Western Balkans to look westward for peace and stability, during a regional summit in Montenegro on Wednesday.

Mike Penice in Podgorica, Montenegro (Getty Images/AFP/S. Prelevic)

Pence told leaders of the Western Balkans that Russia was working to destabilize the region and that they needed to be “resolute and uncompromising in the face of aggression from an unpredictable country that casts a shadow from the east”.

“As you well know, Russia continues to seek to redraw international borders by force. And here, in the Western Balkans, Russia has worked to destabilize the region, undermine your democracies, and divide you from each other and from the rest of Europe,” he said.

Read more: US VP Mike Pence in Estonia raises prospect of deploying Patriot missiles

Russia’s worrying behavior

Pence was speaking at the Adriatic Charter Summit in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) newest member. It was the last stop in a tour through eastern Europe that aimed to reassure allies worried by Russia’s behavior.

Pence accused “Moscow-backed agents” of trying to attack Montenegro’s parliament and assassinate its prime minister at the time, Milo Djukanovic, during an election in October last year. He said the suspected power grab aimed “to dissuade the Montenegrin people from entering our NATO alliance.”

Read more: Kremlin denies Montenegro assassination plot

Read more: ‘Europe is the powder keg – the Balkans are the fuse’

Assasination plot

Pence’s comments stepped up US accusations over the incident, after the White House said in April that it had seen “credible reports of Russian support for an attempted election-day attack” in the ex-Yugoslav republic.

A group of Serbians were arrested over the alleged coup plot and 14 suspects were scheduled to face trial in the Montenegrin capital, including two Russians in absentia.

Leaders from Albania, Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Kosovo, Serbia and Slovenia attended Wednesday’s summit to discuss advancing their Euro-Atlantic aspirations and reforms.

Read more: US VP Mike Pence embarks on European reassurance mission

Read more: The Balkans: From Yugoslav wars to an ever-tense peace

NATO’s doors are open

Watch video04:07

The disputed border between Kosovo and Montenegro

Pence told the leaders that NATO’s door would always be open “for those European countries that share our values, contribute to the common defense, and strive to achieve security, prosperity, and freedom for their people.”

Montenegro joined NATO in early June, angering Russia, which considers it to be part of its historic sphere of influence and a traditional Slavic ally.

Read more: Montenegro ‘entered the West’ through NATO

Serbia is now Russia’s sole ally in the Balkans, although Belgrade officially says it wants to join the European Union. Serbia has been strengthening military ties with Moscow, while maintaining a partnership relationship with NATO.

Earlier in his tour, Pence pledged support for the former Soviet republic of Georgia and met with the presidents of three NATO countries – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania – and proclaimed “an attack on one of us is an attack on us all.”

aw/jr (AP, AFP, Reuters)

Watch video01:44

Ongoing tensions between US, Russia

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Donald Trump signs Russia sanctions bill into law

US President Donald Trump has reluctantly signed legislation imposing new sanctions on Russia, calling it “seriously flawed.” Russia said the bill was akin to a “full-scale trade war.”

St. Basil's Cathedral is seen through a gate in Red Square

The package of financial sanctions against Russia was signed by Trump behind closed doors and away from cameras on Wednesday, several White House sources said.

Read more: Trump-Putin relations: What’s the next move?

The measures, designed to punish Russia’s government for alleged meddling in the 2016 presidential election and annexing the Crimea peninsula from Ukraine among other things, had previously passed through Congress with overwhelming support.

‘Flawed’ bill

Shortly after signing the bill, Trump issued a statement saying it remained “seriously flawed” and hindered his ability to negotiate.

“By limiting the Executive’s flexibility, this bill makes it harder for the United States to strike good deals for the American people, and will drive China, Russia and North Korea much closer together,” Trump said, adding that he signed “for the sake of national unity.”

Watch video01:17

Russian-German ventures to be hit by US sanctions

The bill, which also included increased sanctions against Iran and North Korea, had enough support in Congress to override a presidential veto.

Read more: US tells North Korea: ‘We are not your enemy’ 

In relation to Russia, it mainly targets the country’s energy sector. It includes a provision making it more difficult for the US president to remove sanctions against Russia. That is viewed as a sign of mistrust from the Republican-controlled Congress, as Trump has long made his desire for improved relations with Moscow clear.

Russian response

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said the sanctions ended any hope of improved relations with the US. In a Facebook post, Medvedev claimed “Trump’s administration has demonstrated total impotence by surrendering its executive authority to Congress in the most humiliating way,” before adding that the measures amounted to an “all-out trade war against Russia.”

In a preemptive response to the bill coming into law, Russia ordered the US to reduce the number of its diplomats in the country. It also shut down a recreational compound used by the US embassy on the outskirts of Moscow.

A special prosecutor is investigating whether Trump campaign advisers colluded with Russia ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The US president has denied collusion by his campaign.

Read: Trump admits input in son’s misleading Russia statement

EU concerns

In his statement, Trump said his administration had worked with Congress to make changes to the bill including incorporating feedback from European allies who had been concerned the sanctions could impact German, Austrian or other European companies involved in the Russian Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline project.

Read more: New US Russia sanctions bill risks EU anger

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker on Wednesday told German broadcaster ARD that the US had taken some of the bloc’s concerns into account. But, he reiterated the position that the EU was ready to take counter measures “within days” if the US sanctions harmed European companies.

The bill also placed bans on other countries considered a threat to global security. Iran is being targeted for its ballistic missile program, “destabilizing” activities in the Middle East and human rights abuses. Tehran has argued the sanctions go against the “letter and spirit” of the international nuclear accord signed by Iran and six world powers. The sanctions on North Korea target its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs as well as use of slave labor.

se/kms (AP, Reuters, AFP)

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Venezuela’s top prosecutor opens probe into electoral fraud

The Venezuelan attorney general has described the damning allegations of vote manipulation as a “scandalous act.” The company charged with tallying the result said the number of votes cast had been altered by a million.

A woman holds her infant as she casts her vote in front of a mural of the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez

Luisa Ortega, Venezuela’s attorney general and a fierce critic of President Nicolas Maduro, vowed to investigate claims that the government manipulated Sunday’s controversial election turnout.

“I have appointed two prosecutors to investigate the four directors of the National Electoral Council for this very scandalous act,” Ortega told broadcaster CNN.

Read more: What is Venezuela’s constituent assembly?

Her remarks came just hours after Smartmatic, a British firm tasked with providing Venezuela with the voting technology for Sunday’s ballot, alleged that the turnout numbers they recorded did not correspond with the numbers stated by the National Electoral Council.

Watch video00:40

Controversial vote triggers violence in Venezuela

‘Manipulation of figures’

Venezuela’s National Electoral Council said on Sunday that around 8 million people had come out and voted. That figure, however, was dismissed by many has unrealistically high, as there were no reports of long lines or crowds at polling stations.

On Wednesday, Smartmatic maintained that Electoral Council had artificially inflated the number of voters by up to one million people. High turnout was always going to determine the legitimacy of the Venezuelan government’s proposed constitutional changes, and ultimately the legitimacy of Maduro’s presidency.

“This announcement is very serious because [Smartmatic CEO Antonio Mugica] said that there was manipulation of figures,” Ortega said, adding that it represented “one more element of the fraudulent and unconstitutional process” in forming the Constituent Assembly.

‘The gringos and the Brits’

The international community has condemned the controversial vote, which it says has consolidated the ruling party’s powers by allowing select allies of the president to rewrite the country’s constitution.

Late on Wednesday, Maduro said he would postpone the first meeting of the newly formed constitutional assembly from Thursday to Friday.

“That stupid guy, the president of Smartmatic, pressured to the neck by the gringos and the Brits, said there 7.5 million,” Maduro said commenting on the company’s claims that the vote had been tampered with. “I think there were 10 million Venezuelans who went out.”

Critics fear that the new constitution will give Maduro’s government virtually unlimited powers. Proponents, however, claim it to be a necessary measure to end the opposition’s political roadblocks and to get the country’s depressed economy back on track.

Watch video04:28

Venezuela: Antonietta Ledezma talks to DW

dm/ls (AFP, EFE, AP)

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Trump Supports Plan to Cut Legal Immigration by Half

Photo

President Trump just before an announcement about immigration legislation with Senator Tom Cotton, second from right, and Senator David Perdue, far right, at the White House on Wednesday.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Trump embraced a proposal on Wednesday to slash legal immigration to the United States in half within a decade by sharply curtailing the ability of American citizens and legal residents to bring family members into the country.

The plan would enact the most far-reaching changes to the system of legal immigration in decades and represents the president’s latest effort to stem the flow of newcomers to the United States. Since taking office, he has barred many visitors from select Muslim-majority countries, limited the influx of refugees, increased immigration arrests and pressed to build a wall along the southern border.

In asking Congress to curb legal immigration, Mr. Trump intensified a debate about national identity, economic growth, worker fairness and American values that animated his campaign last year. Critics said the proposal would undercut the fundamental vision of the United States as a haven for the poor and huddled masses, while the president and his allies said the country had taken in too many low-skilled immigrants for too long to the detriment of American workers.

“This legislation will not only restore our competitive edge in the 21st century, but it will restore the sacred bonds of trust between America and its citizens,” Mr. Trump said at a White House event alongside two Republican senators sponsoring the bill. “This legislation demonstrates our compassion for struggling American families who deserve an immigration system that puts their needs first and that puts America first.”

In throwing his weight behind a bill, Mr. Trump added one more long-odds priority to a legislative agenda already packed with them in the wake of the defeat of legislation to repeal and replace President Barack Obama’s health care program. The president has already vowed to overhaul the tax code and rebuild the nation’s roads, airports and other infrastructure.

Continue reading the main story

But by endorsing legal immigration cuts, a move he has long supported, Mr. Trump returned to a theme that has defined his short political career and excites his conservative base at a time when his poll numbers continue to sink. Just 33 percent of Americans approved of his performance in the latest Quinnipiac University survey, the lowest rating of his presidency, and down from 40 percent a month ago.

Democrats and some Republicans quickly criticized the move. “Instead of catching criminals, Trump wants to tear apart communities and punish immigrant families that are making valuable contributions to our economy,” said Tom Perez, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. “That’s not what America stands for.”

The bill, sponsored by Senators Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia, would institute a merit-based system to determine who is admitted to the country and granted legal residency green cards, favoring applicants based on skills, education and language ability rather than relations with people already here. The proposal revives an idea included in broader immigration legislation supported by President George W. Bush that died in 2007.

More than one million people are granted legal residency each year, and the proposal would reduce that by 41 percent in its first year and 50 percent by its 10th year, according to projections cited by its sponsors. The reductions would come largely from those brought in through family connections. The number of immigrants granted legal residency on the basis of job skills, about 140,000, would remain roughly the same.

Under the current system, most legal immigrants are admitted to the United States based on family ties. American citizens can sponsor spouses, parents and minor children for an unrestricted number of visas, while siblings and adult children are given preferences for a limited number of visas available to them. Legal permanent residents holding green cards can also sponsor spouses and children.

In 2014, 64 percent of immigrants admitted with legal residency were immediate relatives of American citizens or sponsored by family members. Just 15 percent entered through employment-based preferences, according to the Migration Policy Institute, an independent research organization. But that does not mean that those who came in on family ties were necessarily low skilled or uneducated.

The legislation would award points based on education, ability to speak English, high-paying job offers, age, record of achievement and entrepreneurial initiative. But while it would still allow spouses and minor children of Americans and legal residents to come in, it would eliminate preferences for other relatives, like siblings and adult children. The bill would create a renewable temporary visa for older-adult parents who come for caretaking purposes.

Video

Stephen Miller Jousts With Reporters Over Immigration

Exchanges between the senior White House adviser and Glenn Thrush of The New York Times and Jim Acosta of CNN became combative at a news briefing on Wednesday.

By THE NEW YORK TIMES on Publish DateAugust 2, 2017. Photo by Doug Mills/The New York Times. Watch in Times Video »

The legislation would limit refugees offered permanent residency to 50,000 a year and eliminate a diversity visa lottery that the sponsors said does not promote diversity. The senators said their bill was meant to emulate systems in Canada and Australia.

The projections cited by the sponsors said legal immigration would decrease to 637,960 after a year and to 539,958 after a decade.

“Our current system does not work,” Mr. Perdue said. “It keeps America from being competitive and it does not meet the needs of our economy today.”

Mr. Cotton said low-skilled immigrants pushed down wages for those who worked with their hands. “For some people, they may think that that’s a symbol of America’s virtue and generosity,” he said. “I think it’s a symbol that we’re not committed to working-class Americans, and we need to change that.”

But Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, noted that agriculture and tourism were his state’s top two industries. “If this proposal were to become law, it would be devastating to our state’s economy, which relies on this immigrant work force,” he said. “Hotels, restaurants, golf courses and farmers,” he added, “will tell you this proposal to cut legal immigration in half would put their business in peril.”

Cutting legal immigration would make it harder for Mr. Trump to reach the stronger economic growth that he has promised. Bringing in more workers, especially during a time of low unemployment, increases the size of an economy. Critics said the plan would result in labor shortages, especially in lower-wage jobs that many Americans do not want.

The National Immigration Forum, an advocacy group, said the country was already facing a work force gap of 7.5 million jobs by 2020. “Cutting legal immigration for the sake of cutting immigration would cause irreparable harm to the American worker and their family,” said Ali Noorani, the group’s executive director.

Surveys show most Americans believe legal immigration benefits the country. In a Gallup poll in January, 41 percent of Americans were satisfied with the overall level of immigration, 11 percentage points higher than the year before and the highest since the question was first asked in 2001. Still, 53 percent of Americans remained dissatisfied.

The plan endorsed by Mr. Trump generated a fiery exchange at the White House briefing when Stephen Miller, the president’s policy adviser and a longtime advocate of immigration limits, defended the proposal. Pressed for statistics to back up claims that immigration was costing Americans jobs, he cited several studies that have been debated by experts.

“But let’s also use common sense here, folks,” Mr. Miller said. “At the end of the day, why do special interests want to bring in more low-skill workers?”

He rejected the argument that immigration policy should also be based on compassion. “Maybe it’s time we had compassion for American workers,” he said.

1068COMMENTS

When a reporter read him some of the words from the Statue of Liberty — “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free” — Mr. Miller dismissed them. “The poem that you’re referring to was added later,” he said. “It’s not actually part of the original Statue of Liberty.”

He noted that in 1970, the United States allowed in only a third as many legal immigrants as it now does: “Was that violating or not violating the Statue of Liberty law of the land?”

Correction: August 2, 2017 
An earlier version of this article misstated part of President Trump’s effort to stem the flow of immigrants into the United States. He has increased immigration arrests, not deportations.

As Washington Tries to Protect Tech, China Could Fight Back

Photo

The Ford Motor plant in Hangzhou, China. China could penalize American companies operating there if a trade dispute broke out. CreditGiulia Marchi for The New York Times

WASHINGTON — As the Trump administration moves to take on China over intellectual property, Washington will find it has limited firepower. Beijing has a strong grip on American technology companies, and global trade rules could favor China.

Technology is proving a major battleground for China and the United States, as both sides vie to protect their economic and national security interests.

Beijing has forced a long list of American companies to enter joint ventures or share research with Chinese players, part of a broader push to create its own technology giants. From makers of smartphones to chips to electric cars, American businesses have reluctantly agreed, fearful of losing access to China, which has the second-largest economy in the world.

China’s ambitions have set off alarms in Washington, with concerns on both sides of the aisle. Robert E. Lighthizer, the United States trade representative, is now preparing a trade case accusing China of extensive violations of intellectual property, according to people with detailed knowledge of the case.

But China can play a strong defense. The country has broad latitude, under special rules it negotiated with the World Trade Organization, to maintain restrictions within its market.

Continue reading the main story

“The problem is that U.S. trade negotiators agreed to provisions allowing China to limit market access for U.S. companies unless they engaged in joint ventures,” said Michael R. Wessel, a member of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, which Congress created to monitor the relationship between the two countries.

“Potential Chinese partners demand the family jewels,” he said. “Companies can say no, but too many give in to Chinese pressure to make a quick buck.”

The current trade frictions trace back to the Clinton administration.

When China was entering the W.T.O. in 1999 and 2000, American negotiators gave Beijing some leeway, a position later supported by the administration of George W. Bush. As a developing country, China was allowed extra protections, such as requirements that companies in critical industries work with Chinese partners. China, in return, promised to shed the extra rules gradually as its economy matured.

But Beijing did not open up, even as China evolved into an economic powerhouse. Quite the opposite has happened under President Xi Jinping, who has pursued a more nationalistic agenda than his reform-minded predecessors.

China now sees the technology sector as a critical piece of its industrial policy — a policy that Beijing is aggressively enlisting American tech giants to support and that the leadership will most likely go all out to protect.

Beijing’s demands have been partly driven by security concerns, particularly after disclosures by Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, of electronic spying by the United States on China’s rapid military buildup.

China has also been explicit about its economic motives, seeking to dominate fast-growing global industries that could create millions of well-paid jobs for a generation of increasingly well-educated young Chinese.

GRAPHIC

Building Trade Walls

The Trump administration faces the problem that China’s high trade barriers are allowed by the World Trade Organization, because China entered the group as a developing country and insists it still is one.

 OPEN GRAPHIC

In several cases, China’s strategy to control technology approaches the kind of oversight most countries reserve for industries serving the military or government.

New Chinese rules often force foreign tech companies into partnerships with local companies — in part to gain expertise, in part to assert control. Other guidance from the government has indicated that companies must invest more in China to continue to have access to the market. Apple has opened research and development centers in the country as part of a new charm campaign.

In the chip sector, a major initiative intended to lift Chinese capabilities has drafted America’s biggest makers of the electronic brains that run everything from smartphones to driverless cars. Over the past four years, America’s largest chip companies have entered into a dizzying network of partnerships unlike anything they have anywhere else.

Qualcomm works with a company in southwest China to develop server chips. In 2014, Intel signed agreements with two Chinese chip makers, Spreadtrum and Rockchip, to give it a leg up in the market for China’s smartphones and tablets. Last year, Intel agreed to a partnership with the influential Tsinghua University in China as part of a bid to make server chips that match local specifications.

IBM and Advanced Micro Devices have both licensed chip technology to Chinese partners with ties to China’s military. GlobalFoundries, a California-based company, joined forces with a local government in central China to build a $10 billion chip manufacturing plant there.

American technology companies can find themselves at a serious disadvantage in China unless they agree to cooperate with government-linked Chinese businesses.

Take cloud computing, the fast-growing business of leasing computer power to companies. Chinese laws require foreign companies to join with local partners and allow them only a minority stake. International businesses are also blocked from branding such services under their own names.

Both Microsoft and Amazon, dominant forces in cloud computing in the United States, have local partnerships in China. By contrast, China’s e-commerce giant Alibaba operates two data centers in the United States without any partner.

Another rule calls for data about Chinese consumers or business operations to be stored in China. Apple and Amazon recently set up data centers in China, again with local partners, to store more customer information in the country.

Against that backdrop, the call for trade action is attracting bipartisan support.

Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, which handles trade issues, met with Mr. Lighthizer Wednesday morning and gave him a letter supporting a challenge to Chinese policies. “China’s forced technology transfer policies are among the key challenges facing U.S. innovators operating in China or otherwise competing with Chinese firms,” Senator Wyden wrote.

China can make its own play under global trade rules. Beijing can quickly demand binding arbitration — and could have a good chance of winning. China was allowed into the W.T.O. with very few limits on its ability to regulate services or foreign investment, two categories in which China was fairly weak when it entered the organization in 2001.

If China did win a W.T.O. case, it would then have the right to restrict American exports to the same extent that the United States restricts Chinese imports.

China consistently exports four times as much to the United States as it imports. Even so, China could penalize American companies like Apple and Starbucks that have very large operations that produce and sell in China with minimal imports from the United States.

“U.S. negotiators, I think, basically dropped the ball,” said Nicholas R. Lardy, a longtime trade expert at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, referring to the rules on services that were negotiated when China entered the W.T.O. “They didn’t think China was very important.”

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