Las Vegas Shooting Live Updates: Multiple Weapons Found in Gunman’s Hotel Room

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Mass Shooting in Las Vegas

At least 58 people were killed and hundreds injured when a gunman opened fire at a country music festival near the Mandalay Bay casino.

By CAMILLA SCHICK, DAVE HORN and CHRIS CIRILLO on Publish DateOctober 2, 2017. Photo by David Becker/Getty Images.Watch in Times Video »

LAS VEGAS — A gunman on a high floor of a Las Vegas hotel rained a rapid-fire barrage on an outdoor concert festival on Sunday night, leaving at least 59 people dead, injuring 527 others, and sending thousands of terrified survivors fleeing for cover, in one of the deadliest mass shootings in American history.

Online video of the attack near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino showed the singer Jason Aldean’s performance at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, a three-day country music event, being interrupted by the sound of gunfire. The music stopped, and as victims fell bleeding, concertgoers screamed, ducked for cover, or ran. “Get down,” one shouted. “Stay down,” screamed another.

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Route 91Harvest Festival
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• The police found the gunman, whom they identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, dead in his room at the hotel. Investigators were still combing through Mr. Paddock’s background and searching his home on Monday.

• The Islamic State claimed that Mr. Paddock was one of its soldiers, but did not provide any evidence of its claim. The F.B.I. said there was no evidence so far that Mr. Paddock had ties to any international terrorist organization.

• Speaking at the White House, President Trump condemned the shooting as an “act of pure evil” and called for the country to come together, saying, “Our unity cannot be shattered by evil, our bonds cannot be broken by violence.”

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Tending to the wounded outside the festival ground. CreditDavid Becker/Getty Images

The police found an arsenal in the gunman’s hotel room.

At least 17 firearms, including a handgun, were found in Mr. Paddock’s hotel room, said Sheriff Joseph Lombardo of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. Some were rifles equipped with scopes, he said, adding that Mr. Paddock used multiple rifles during the attack.

A federal law enforcement official earlier said there were at least 20 rifles in the suite, along with hundreds of rounds of ammunition, including two rifles outfitted with scopes and set up on tripods in front of two big windows. Another official said that among the weapons were AR-15-style assault rifles. Both officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to divulge details of the investigation.

The police also found ammonium nitrate, a fertilizer that can be used in explosives, in Mr. Paddock’s car in Las Vegas.

In addition to the weapons at the hotel, the sheriff said the police retrieved “in excess of” 18 firearms, as well as explosives, several thousand rounds of ammunition and “electronic devices” from Mr. Paddock’s home in Mesquite, Nev. He said the police were evaluating the electronic devices, which he did not describe.

Who was the gunman?

Mr. Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, had no significant prior criminal history, officials said. Investigators are trying to piece together Mr. Paddock’s financial history to search for clues that could help determine what set him off. The F.B.I. has sent dozens of agents and evidence technicians to Las Vegas.

The gunman’s father, Benjamin Patrick Paddock, had a troubled history, according to Eric Paddock of Orlando, Fla., a brother of the suspect. Benjamin Paddock was convicted of serial bank robbery in 1961, according to news reports from the time. After he escaped from prison, he was on the F.B.I.’s “Top 10” most wanted list for much of the 1970s.

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Stephen Paddock in a photo provided by his brother Eric Paddock. Creditvia Associated Press

Eric Paddock said he had made a statement to the police. In an interview with CBS, he said that his brother was “not an avid gun guy at all,” adding, “if he had have killed my kids, I couldn’t be more dumbfounded.”

“The fact that he had those kind of weapons is just — where the hell did he get automatic weapons?” Eric Paddock asked.

“He has no military background or anything like that,” he added. “He’s a guy who lived in a house in Mesquite and drove down and gambled in Las Vegas.”

He said Stephen Paddock had recently texted him to ask how their mother was faring after Hurricane Irma.

Sheriff Lombardo said that Marilou Danley, whom he called Mr. Paddock’s girlfriend, was in Tokyo, and the police were arranging to interview her when she returns to the United States.

Before dawn on Monday, the police searched Mr. Paddock’s house in Mesquite, a town on the Nevada-Arizona border. The police moved cautiously at first, evacuating surrounding homes in case there were any explosives, but none were found. The Mesquite Police Department said no one was in the house; at least one firearm and ammunition were found, they said, but they gave few other details about what the search turned up.

The police blocked off the entrance to the neighborhood, but Tom Jennings, 76, a forensic engineer, emerged to check his mail. “This is not Mesquite,” he said, wide-eyed and clearly shaken.

“It makes you sick,” he said. “You just never know who you are living next door to.”

Guests at the Mandalay Bay are in shock.

The hotel remained on partial lockdown late Monday morning, as it had since the shooting. The casino floor was largely empty, though a few gamblers played slots. Hotel employees were offering coffee, pastries and cases of water to stranded guests.

A bellman at the hotel said the gunman’s car was still in the valet, which had been shut down.

Melissa Ayala, 41, came to the country music festival with four friends from Orange, Calif. They were drinking and laughing when they heard what they thought was fireworks. She did not realize it was gunfire until a man near them was grazed by a bullet and fell to the ground, blood coming from his neck.

“It seemed like rapid fire,” she said. “There was blood pouring everywhere.”

“Where do you run to?” said her friend, Shami Espinoza, 38, as she wiped away tears.

“It’s either run and get shot and die or stay and get shot and die. Those were the choices.”

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Officers ran to the scene of the shooting in Las Vegas on Sunday night. CreditJohn Locher/Associated Press

What about the ISIS claim?

The Islamic State claimed on Monday that the gunman was “a Soldier of the Islamic State,” but the group did not provide any evidence for its claim. It has previously made false claims about its role in some terrorist attacks.

Aaron Rouse, the F.B.I. special agent in charge in Las Vegas, said that so far there was no proof that Mr. Paddock had links to any international terrorist organization.

Citing a “source,” the terror group’s Amaq news agency said the assailant had “responded to calls for targeting Coalition countries.”

That phrase is a reference to a famous 2014 speech by Abu Muhammad al-Adnani, a former Islamic State spokesman, who called for sympathizers around the world to carry out violence in the group’s name on the soil of countries involved in the fight against ISIS.

In a second bulletin about the Las Vegas shooting, Amaq said the attacker had converted to Islam months earlier.

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Debris and belongings that had been left behind littered the site of the mass shooting in Las Vegas on Monday. CreditJohn Locher/Associated Press

The gunman recently bought several weapons.

Christopher Sullivan, general manager of Guns & Guitars, a gun shop in Mesquite, Nev., said he was awakened at 4 a.m. Monday by a telephone call from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, which was tracing Mr. Paddock’s guns.

Mr. Sullivan confirmed that Mr. Paddock had bought three guns at his shop — a handgun and two rifles — within the last year. All the purchases were legal and cleared routine federal screening, Mr. Sullivan said.

“The man does not have a criminal history,” Mr. Sullivan said of Mr. Paddock.

Mr. Sullivan, who said he had also been contacted by the F.B.I. and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, would not provide detailed descriptions of the guns. “We have cooperated with local and federal authorities,” he said.

He described Mr. Paddock as seeming like “a normal fellow, a normal guy — nothing out of the ordinary.”

“As for what goes on in a person’s mind, I couldn’t tell you,” Mr. Sullivan said. “I know nothing about him personally.”

GRAPHIC

How the Shooting in Las Vegas Unfolded

The attack was one of the deadliest mass shootings in American history.

 OPEN GRAPHIC

How did the shooting unfold?

The first reports of the shooting came at 10:08 p.m. local time. Officers were overheard on police radio channels reporting that they were pinned down by gunfire. Shortly before midnight, the Las Vegas police reported that “one suspect is down,” and soon after, the police said they did not believe there were any more active gunmen.

The Route 91 Harvest Festival bills itself as “three days of country music on the Vegas Strip,” and Sunday night’s performance was the last of the festival. The site of the concert, the Las Vegas Village and Festival Grounds, operated by MGM Resorts, sprawls over 15 acres and has a capacity of 40,000 people. The festival’s website said this year’s three-day concert was sold out.

Tenaja Floyd of Boise, Idaho, said many of the people around her in the concert crowd thought at first that the sounds came from fireworks, but “I knew immediately, that wasn’t fireworks.” She said her mother, Jennifer, threw her to the ground and lay on top of her to protect her. As people started running out of the venue, she said, they thought they might be trampled, so they decided to join the rush to leave.

Video of the shooting captured nine seconds of continuous rapid fire, followed by 37 seconds of silence from the weapon and panicked screaming from the crowd. Gunfire then erupted again in at least two more bursts, both shorter than the first.

In the confusion after the shooting, the police also descended on the Ali Baba Restaurant, about a 10-minute drive from the Mandalay Bay, and investigated reports of a shooting at the New York-New York Hotel and Casino, not far from the concert ground.

The police reported clearing out the Mandalay Bay’s 29th floor and then working their way up to the 32nd floor. A police Twitter post described reports of an “active shooter” near or around the Mandalay Bay casino.

SWAT units swarmed the upper floors of the Mandalay Bay, closing in on the source of the shooting, a room on the 32nd floor where they found the gunman with “in excess of 10 rifles,” the sheriff said. “We believe the individual killed himself prior to our entry.”

Video from the shooting showed Mr. Aldean, the final performer of the night, running off the stage as the gunfire erupted.

Jake Owen, a country singer who was on stage with Mr. Aldean when the shooting began, told CNN on Monday that it was like “shooting fish in a barrel from where he was.”

“This is not an exaggeration: This shooting was going on for at least 10 minutes,” he added. “It was nonstop.”

Concertgoers described hearing round after round of gunfire. “Everyone was running, you could see people getting shot,” Gail Davis, one of the witnesses, said. “I’ve never been that scared in my life,” she added. “To have this happen, I can’t wrap my mind around it.”

The president calls the shooting ‘an act of pure evil.’

Speaking at the White House, President Trump called the shooting “an act of pure evil,” ordered flags flown at half-staff, and said he would travel to Las Vegas on Wednesday.

“The F.B.I. and the Department of Homeland Security are working closely with local authorities to assist in the investigation,” Mr. Trump said, and he praised the performance of the Las Vegas police. “The speed with which they reacted was miraculous and prevented further loss of life.”

A Burst of Gunfire, a Pause, Then Carnage That Would Not Stop in Las Vegas

Video

Mass Shooting in Las Vegas

At least 58 people were killed and hundreds injured when a gunman opened fire at a country music festival near the Mandalay Bay casino.

By CAMILLA SCHICK, DAVE HORN and CHRIS CIRILLO on Publish DateOctober 2, 2017. Photo by David Becker/Getty Images. Watch in Times Video »

LAS VEGAS — At first, it sounded like fireworks, and then the meaning of the loud, crackling noise began to spread, unevenly, through the huge crowd.

It dawned on people when they heard screams, when they saw bloodied victims collapse around them, or when others stampeded for the exits, trampling some of the people in their way.

Many of the terrified people followed their instincts and crouched or lay flat, not realizing that they remained exposed to a gunman lodged high above them, while others surged into surrounding streets and buildings, leaving behind a litter of drink cups, cellphones, bags and shoes lost in the panic.

By sunrise on Monday, the staggering toll at an outdoor country music festival on a cool desert night was becoming clear: at least 59 people died, the police said, and 527 were injured, either by gunfire or in the flight to safety.

A lone gunman perched on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, had smashed the windows of his hotel suite with a hammer, taken aim at a crowd that the police said numbered 22,000 people, and committed one of the deadliest mass shootings in American history.

At least 20 rifles and hundreds of rounds of ammunition were found in the suite, a law enforcement official said. Among the guns were AR-15-style assault rifles, another official said.

The gunman had two rifles, outfitted with scopes, set up on tripods in front of two big windows, said the first official. Both spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to divulge details of the investigation.

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A woman covered with blood at the festival. CreditDavid Becker/Getty Images

The authorities did not immediately say what model of weapon or weapons the gunman fired, but on videos posted online by witnesses, the rapid-fire sound indicated that it was fully automatic, like a machine gun.

Among the revelers below at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, Melissa Ayala, 41, said she first realized what was happening when a man near her fell to the ground, blood spurting from his neck.

“It seemed like rapid fire,” she said. “There was blood pouring everywhere.”

She said she and four friends, who had come to the festival from California, were drinking and laughing when they heard the gunfire, which at first they thought was fireworks.

“It was just total chaos,” she said. “People falling down and laying everywhere. We were trying to take cover and we had no idea where to go.”

Her friend, Shami Espinoza, 38, wiped away tears and said it seemed their only choices were “either run and get shot and die, or stay and get shot and die.”

The police identified the gunman as Stephen Paddock, 64, a retiree with no significant criminal history, who liked to gamble and seemed to live a quiet life with his girlfriend in Mesquite, Nev. Sheriff Joseph Lombardo of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said SWAT units swarmed into the hotel, starting on the 29th floor, going floor by floor and room by room, before finding the gunman in his room..

“We believe the individual killed himself prior to our entry,” the sheriff said.

Mr. Paddock was in a suite, number 32135, a hotel employee said, giving him sweeping views to the east and north.

Eric Paddock, a brother of Stephen Paddock who lives in Orlando, Fla., told CBS News that his brother was “not an avid gun guy at all,” adding, “if he had have killed my kids, I couldn’t be more dumbfounded.”

Photo

Concertgoers ran for cover as gunshots rang out. CreditDavid Becker/Getty Images

“The fact that he had those kind of weapons is just — where the hell did he get automatic weapons?” Eric Paddock asked.

“He has no military background or anything like that,” he added. “He’s a guy who lived in a house in Mesquite and drove down and gambled in Las Vegas.”

He said Stephen Paddock had recently texted him to ask how their mother was faring after Hurricane Irma.

The Islamic State terrorist group, through its news agency, Amaq, claimed responsibility for the attack, saying that Mr. Paddock had converted to Islam months earlier, and had “responded to calls for targeting coalition countries” that are fighting the group in Syria and Iraq. That phrasing usually indicates that the attacker was inspired by the group, rather than directed by it, but such claims have not always proved accurate in the past.

Aaron Rouse, special agent in charge of the FBI office in Las Vegas, said, “We have determined to this point no connection with an international terrorist group.”

The first reports of the shooting came at 10:08 p.m. local time. Officers were overheard on police radio channels reporting that they were pinned down by gunfire. Shortly before midnight, the Las Vegas police reported that “one suspect is down,” and soon after, the police said they did not believe there were any more active gunmen.

Speaking at the White House, President Trump called the shooting “an act of pure evil,” ordered flags flown at half-staff, and said he would travel to Las Vegas on Wednesday.

“The F.B.I. and the Department of Homeland Security are working closely with local authorities to assist in the investigation,” Mr. Trump said, and he praised the performance of the Las Vegas police. “The speed with which they reacted was miraculous and prevented further loss of life.”

Photo

A police officer near the site of the shooting on Sunday. CreditEthan Miller/Getty Images

Video of the shooting captured nine seconds of rapid-fire, continuous bursts of fire, followed by 37 seconds of silence from the weapon and panicked screaming from the crowd. When the shooting began, the country music artist Jason Aldean continued singing “When She Says Baby” for a few seconds before realizing what was happening and taking cover.

Gunfire then erupted again in at least two more bursts, both shorter than the first.

In the confusion after the shooting, the police also descended on the Ali Baba Restaurant, about a 10-minute drive from the Mandalay Bay, and they also investigated reports of a shooting at the New York-New York Hotel and Casino, not far from the concert ground.

Jake Owen, a country singer who was on stage with Mr. Aldean when the shooting began, told CNN on Monday that it was like “shooting fish in a barrel from where he was.”

“This is not an exaggeration: This shooting was going on for at least 10 minutes,” he added. “It was nonstop.”

Concertgoers described hearing round after round of gunfire. “Everyone was running, you could see people getting shot,” Gail Davis, one of the witnesses, said. “I’ve never been that scared in my life,” she added. “To have this happen, I can’t wrap my mind around it.”

University Medical Center, which has Nevada’s only level 1 trauma center, took in 104 patients, arriving by ambulance and private cars, including four who died, and 12 who were in critical condition on Monday morning. “We had our first rush and it was nonstop,” said Danita Cohen, a hospital administrator.

Ordinarily, the trauma center would taken in eight to 10 traffic accident victims in a night. But the trauma teams regularly train for mass casualty events; the most recent session was led by an emergency responder from the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando.

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican Hospital received 56 patients at its three campuses, including four who were in critical condition. Most had suffered gunshots, but others had been trampled while fleeing, or had been hurt climbing fences to escape the shooting.

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The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department released this photo of Marilou Danley, the gunman’s “companion.” CreditLas Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

“No one has experienced patient volumes to this level,” said Jennifer Cooper, a hospital spokeswoman.

As survivors poured into streets and buildings surrounding the concert site, and the police and paramedics streamed into the scene, unsure how many gunmen there were, the massacre shut down roads and highways; the police reported closing off about a mile of Las Vegas Boulevard and asked the public to steer clear of the area. Hours later, much of the city remained at shut down.

McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, just east of the Mandalay, said that some flights destined for the airport were diverted because of police activity, and some of the people fleeing the scene ran to the airport, disrupting operations there. Some survivors reported trying to climb the chain-link, barbed wire-topped security fence around the airport, until firefighters ripped the fence up from the ground, allowing them to crawl under it.

Krystal Legette, who was visiting from New York, and several other people were at Sundance Helicopters office at the airport, waiting for a sightseeing flight around the city, when she said three women burst into the building, screaming, “They’re shooting, they’re shooting.” Then another woman came in, bleeding from a bullet wound in her right arm, and Ms. Legette, a nurse, and three others applied a tourniquet.

More and more people ran into the office, until about 100 people had taken shelter there, she said. A company worker turned out the lights, locked the doors and told everyone to go inside closets and other areas away from the windows.

The hotel itself was placed on virtual lockdown after the shooting, guests said.

“We went into the hotel and they started shutting down casinos,” Todd Price, a guest of Mandalay Bay, told CNN. “We tried to get into our rooms, and they shut down the elevators and started to get everybody out.”

The Route 91 Harvest Festival bills itself as “three days of country music on the Vegas Strip,” and Sunday night’s performance was the last of the festival. The site of the concert, the Las Vegas Village and Festival Grounds, run by MGM Resorts, sprawls over 15 acres and has a capacity of 40,000 people. The festival’s website said this year’s three-day concert was sold out.

In the first hours after the shooting, the police searched for a woman described as “a companion” of the gunman, Marilou Danley. Later, the sheriff said she had been located out of the country, and apparently was not with Mr. Paddock when he checked into the hotel, but that “he was utilizing some of her identification.”

Eric Paddock identified Ms. Danley as his brother’s girlfriend. “We were worried that he might have hurt her, too,” he said.

How Donald Trump turned a simmering NFL controversy into a movement that splits the country

By insulting players that “take a knee” during the anthem at NFL games, President Trump has again rallied his base and fueled divisions in the country. But the controversy also highlights some common misconceptions.

Colin Kaepernick (Reuters/USA Today Sports/K. Lee)Kaepernick, along with Eli Harold (left) and Eric Reid (right) kneel before an NFL game in 2016

The “take a knee” debate currently raging in the US began last year when Colin Kaepernick, then-quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers in the National Football League (NFL), decided not to stand during the playing of the US national anthem at games to protest police violence against African-Americans.

When US President Donald Trump recently decided to insert himself into the debateover such a charged issue, the results were explosive. The simmering controversy over Kaepernick and several other NFL players protesting the issue on a public stage turned into a national altercation.

“Ironically, what President Trump did is he expanded the participation of black athletes in the movement because he said something so outrageous,” saidTheresa Runstedtler, a scholar of African-American history with a focus on black culture and sports at American University.

Celeb athletes, civil rights icons show solidarity

The “outrageous” statement Runstedtler was referring to was President Trump’s remark at a Republican rally in Alabama when he said that “wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired. He’s fired!’”

Trump then went on to assure the audience that this behavior would stop and suggested people should leave the arena when players “take a knee”. The president’s attempt to stifle attempts at peaceful protest has not sit well with many players, owners, celebrities and the general public. The remarks prompted a dramatic rise in NFL players across the country “taking a knee” during the anthem and many team owners joining them. It also triggered a wave of solidarity that included NBA legend Bill Russell or civil rights icon John Lewis posting pictures of themselves “taking a knee” on Twitter.

During another period, we knelt. There is nothing wrong with kneeling down to stand up against injustice. It’s protected by the Constitution

On Tuesday, Trump doubled down on in a tweet, declaring: “The NFL has all sorts of rules and regulations. The only way out for them is to set a rule that you can’t kneel during our National Anthem!”

Divided country

Trump’s latest comments have done nothing to bridge the already deep divisions in the country. According to a new survey, Americans are divided along racial and political lines over NFL players kneeling during the national anthem and over President Trump’s handling of the issue . An NBC poll found participants disapproving of the NFL national anthem protests by a margin of 52-38, yet also disapproving of the president’s comments by a margin of 48-38.

“It tells us that we have an incredibly divided country and that a large number of whites are completely identified with Donald Trump making the most divisive and provocative statements towards racial minorities, in this case African-Americans,” said Mark Naison, a professor of history and African-American Studies at Fordham University and a former political activist.

Distraction from other debacles

As to Trump’s possible motivation to insert himself into the debate, both Naison and Runstedtler argue that rallying his base in light of the health care debacle and criticism over his handling of the crisis in Puerto Rico could play a role.

“How do you rally your constituency when you just had this enormous failure?”, asked Naison. “One of the ways to do it is by appealing to racial resentment, which is what got him elected in the first place.”

African-American history scholar Runstedtler adds that Trump “knew he could touch a nerve with his conservative base, which watches football and probably doesn’t agree when Colin Kaepernick and other black athletes stand against police brutality and structural racism in the United States.”

New phenomena

USA Washington Sportsbar (DW/M. Knigge)Sports fan Jack Milne says he prefers baseball anyway, as the NFL teams move around too much

At Blaguard, a neighborhood sports bars in northwest Washington, D.C., Jack Milne, a 70-year-old retired IT professional said he tried to tune out the whole NFL controversy. However, Milne said, he was not offended by players kneeling during the anthem, because “people have always protested stuff” and “there was a time, a long time ago, when presidents only spoke about political things.”

Alex Makrs, 30, works at Blaguard and has season tickets for the local NFL franchise, the Washington Redskins. He had a more pronounced opinion on the controversy: “It wasn’t an issue until Trump made it an issue.” Makrs was in attendance last weekend when the entire Redskins team locked arms and several players kneeled during the national anthem. He was not offended by the athletes’ silent protest, he said.

USA Washington Sportsbar (DW/M. Knigge)NFL fan Alex Makrs finds Trump’s interference more problematic than the protests

“I was more offended by the people booing in the stadium. I think most of them don’t even know why they are booing”, he said, adding that the protest was not about the flag, but about racial problems.

Makrs also pointed out that the widely held notion that NFL players traditionally stood during the playing of the national anthem was a misconception since the practice was a relatively new phenomenon.

Paid patriotism

Indeed, it was only in 2009 that NFL players began standing for the anthem. Previously, players remained in the locker room until the game started.

Many critics have charged that these contrived shows of patriotism don’t belong in the professional sports arena. Despite the NFL’s popular image, its patriotic displays are very calculated. Two years ago, Republican Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake published a scathing 150-page oversight report called “Tackling Paid Patriotism” which detailed how the NFL and other professional sports leagues in the US received millions of dollars from the Pentagon to honor military service members at games through things like aircraft flyovers. In response, the NFL said last year that it would return the taxpayer money it had received.

Finally, the “take a knee” controversy has highlighted another misconception about sports, said the scholars Runstedtler and Maison, namely that sports and politics should be separated.

“Sports reflects the society in which they happen”, said Runstedtler. “Sports are already laden with racial politics and they already were even before Donald Trump made those statements. The playing of the anthem at a sporting event is already a political act.”

Sports reflects society

“Sports mirrors social and economic divisions in this society and creates a spectacle which encourages us to forget that,” said Maison.

The players, added Runstedler, did not create the divisions in society that are now becoming apparent. As an example, she referred to the fact that almost all NFL team owners are white, while the majority of NFL players are African-American.

“Just because they are athletes doesn’t mean that they check their civil rights at the door,” she said.

 

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