‘US should mind its own business; it shouldn’t be in Syria’ – Ron Paul

‘US should mind its own business; it shouldn’t be in Syria’ – Ron Paul
The US has no right to fly into Syrian airspace where it shouldn’t be and set boundaries but should mind its own business. Otherwise, it is an act of aggression, says former US Congressman Ron Paul.

The US fighter jet downed an armed drone belonging to pro-Syrian government forces in southern Syria, near a base in the al-Tanf region, on June, 20 as the drone was advancing on US-backed forces, according to a coalition statement.

This is happening at a time of escalating tension between Moscow and Washington. Also on Tuesday, Australia said it is temporarily suspending air operations in Syria.

RT discussed the latest developments in Syria with former US Congressman Ron Paul.

RT: Australia halted its cooperation. How significant is this development? Why did they do it?

Ron Paul: I think that is good. Maybe wise enough, I wish we could do the same thing – just come home. It just makes no sense; there’s a mess over there. So many people are involved, the neighborhood ought to take care of it, and we have gone too far away from our home. It has been going on for too long, and it all started when Obama in 2011 said: “Assad has to go.” And now as the conditions deteriorate …it looks like Assad and his allies are winning, and the US don’t want them to take Raqqa. This just goes on and on. I think it is really still the same thing that Obama set up – “Get rid of Assad” and there is a lot of frustration because Assad is still around and now it is getting very dangerous, it is dangerous on both sides. One thing that I am concerned about – because I’ve seen it happen so often over the years are false flags. Some accidents happen. Even if it is an honest accident or it is deliberate by one side or the other to blame somebody. And before they stop and think about it, then there is more escalation. When our planes are flying over there and into airspace where we shouldn’t be, and we are setting up boundaries and say “don’t cross these lines or you will be crossing our territory.” We have no right to do this. We should mind our own business; we shouldn’t be over there, when we go over there and decide that we are going to take over, it is an act of aggression, and I am positively opposed to that. And I think most Americans are too if they get all the information they need.

RT: Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said earlier that he wanted to ask his American counterpart why the US-led coalition isn’t targeting Al-Nusra in Syria. What sort of answer do you think he’ll get?

RP: I think it will be wishy-washy. He’ll probably think it is in their interests not to do anything to damage the radicals, the extremists, the rebels because I think that our government thinks that they could be helpful in undermining Assad. I don’t think they are going to say “Yeah, they are our buddies now, we consult with them all the time.” It won’t be that. They’ll argue “We have to help the Kurds out” or something along those lines and make excuses. I think that there’s a net benefit to the radicals for us to get involved there and it is not helpful in the long run for our position which ought to try to bring about peace.

The propaganda the American people hear is such that they get them pretty excited about it, but I am very confident that if the American people had more information…because when I talk to them, they side with my arguments. It doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to be doing what we are doing, and that’s why I persist in trying to get to the facts but trying to eliminate the danger, try to obey international law, try to do the things that are in our best interest. And if we are talking about America’s interest – it isn’t helped by our policy in the Middle East for the last 15-20 years, I think it has all been negative.

Richard Black, Republican member of Virginia State Senate, told RT that “the US and the coalition are in Syria without any permission, without any lawful authority to be present”.

“Some members of the coalition may say “We are in clear violation of international law, maybe this is not right.” Others bought into this coalition to be part of a group fighting ISIS, and now they are saying “Wait a minute. We didn’t go into Syria to fight the legitimate duly elected government of Syria; we went there to fight this terrorist organization.”…The coalition is certainly not there to help the Syrian people; it is there to help Saudi Arabia with its Wahhabi radical Islamic domination of the entire world beginning with the countries close to it”.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

Are US and Russia inching toward confrontation in Syria?

The downing of a Syrian military plane by a US fighter jet is the latest – and perhaps most serious – sign of a stepped-up US military role in the war. That could put the United States on a collision course with Russia.

F/A-18E Super Hornet

When a US Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet shot down a Russian-made Syrian SU-22 warplane after it reportedly attacked US-supported fighters near the embattled city of Raqqa, it did not take long for Moscow to respond to what it viewed as an “aggression” against Syrian government forces, which the Kremlin backs.

DW RECOMMENDS

Russia, Iran and Turkey have agreed on the establishment of “deescalation” zones in Syria. It may be a step in the right direction, but it doesn’t mark a turning point in the Syria conflict, says Loay Mudhoon. (11.05.2017)

Russian officials not only suspended the so-called deconfliction channel with the United States that was set up to avoid potential military incidents between the two countries, but also said the military would shoot down any foreign aircraft west of the Euphrates River, which they consider the Kremlin’s area of operations.

Yezid Sayigh, a senior fellow with the Carnegie Middle East Center, said the key question about the latest incident was why Syria’s government would even deploy a fighter jet over Raqqa, which it has not done for years.

“My assessment is that the Assad regime is testing and probing the US ‘red lines’ there and in the badia – i.e., the southeast desert areas – and the US is simply asserting that red line, no more,” Sayigh wrote in an email.

‘Risks of escalation’

The incident put a spotlight on the intensifying proxy war in Syria between forces backed by Russia and those supported by the United States, a conflict that has the potential to increasingly pit the two countries directly against each other in the battle over the future of Syria.

Prior to shooting down the warplane, US forces had struck pro-government soldiers three times in recent weeks to counter what officials said were attacks on US-backed troops in the country.

The US has recently ramped up military support for allied groups in Syria in an effort drive the so-called “Islamic State” (IS) out of the city of Raqqa, considered to be the group’s last stronghold in the country.

Russian soldiers in liquefied AleppoRussia’s military support has been key to the survival of the Assad regime

“The risks of escalation and of direct confrontation and more direct conflict between the United States and Russia have increased, and some might even say there are fait accompli since the number of incidents has increased,” saidJonathan Stevenson, a former National Security Council director for political-military affairs, Middle East and North Africa, in the Obama White House.

“It’s a very dangerous situation,” said Iwan Morgan, professor of US studies at University College London. “The chances of confrontation have risen significantly.”

Though there is an increased risk for direct confrontation, both Stevenson and Morgan said neither the United States nor Russia had any interest in letting the situation further escalate.

US officials likely want to avoid seeing things spiral to a point that ultimately could require a bigger ground troop deployment in Syria than intended, said Stevenson, who is currently a senior fellow with the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Watch video01:32

US-backed militias push into IS-held Raqqa

No interest in confrontation

Russia should also be wary of any further escalation, Stevenson said, as that could push its military into a situation in which its forces are overstretched in such a way that they would not be able match the capabilities of the United States – “essentially having a bluff called.”

Morgan pointed out that, although neither the United States nor Russia has an interest in confrontation, “of course you could say that about many conflicts in history which then reach a certain point and then boil over.”

He added that he was also worried about a possible confrontation between the United States and Iran, which has been the Syrian government’s other key backer.

Vladimir Putin and Hassan RouhaniIran and Russia are the major outside backers of the Assad government

Further hostilities

In May, in an incident that received comparatively little attention, US fighter jets struck Shiite forces that had ventured too close to US troops along Syria’s border with Iraq.

The scholars agreed that, though a broader US strategy – one that goes beyond the current counterterrorism operation against IS – is difficult to discern, regime change, at least for the moment, is not on Washington’s agenda.

But, Stevenson said, further hostilities between Russia and the United States – whether intentional or accidental – should not come as a surprise, especially if the use of the deconfliction channel becomes more sporadic and the US incrementally increases its operations in support of opposition forces.

AUDIOS AND VIDEOS ON THE TOPIC

US responds to Russian threat after shoot-down of Syrian jet

U.S. pilots operating over Syria won’t hesitate to defend themselves from Russian threats, a Pentagon spokesperson said Monday in the latest escalation between the two superpowers since a U.S. jet shot down a Syrian aircraft on Sunday.

“We do not seek conflict with any party in Syria other than ISIS, but we will not hesitate to defend ourselves or our partners if threatened,” Capt. Jeff Davis told Fox News.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford doubled down on that rhetoric during a Monday speech at the National Press Club.

“I’m confident that we are still communicating between our operations center and the Russia federation operations center — and I’m also confident that our forces have the capability to take care of themselves,” Dunford said.

Department of Defense spokesperson Maj. Adrian J.T. Rankine-Galloway said coalition aircraft would continue conducting “operations throughout Syria, targeting ISIS forces and providing air support for Coalition partner forces on the ground.”

“As a result of recent encounters involving pro-Syrian Regime and Russian forces, we have taken prudent measures to re-position aircraft over Syria so as to continue targeting ISIS forces while ensuring the safety of our aircrew given known threats in the battlespace,” Rankine-Galloway said in a statement.

Earlier Monday, Russian officials threatened to treat U.S.-led coalition planes flying in Syria, west of the Euphrates River, would be considered targets.

The news came one day after the first time in history a U.S. jet shot down a Syrian plane – and the first time in nearly 20 years the U.S. has shot down any warplane in air-to-air combat.

The last time a U.S. jet had shot down another country’s aircraft came over Kosovo in 1999 when a U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle shot down a Serbian MiG-29.

On Sunday, it was a U.S. F-18 Super Hornet that shot down a Syrian SU-22 after that jet dropped bombs near U.S. partner forces taking on ISIS.

Russia’s defense ministry also said Monday it was suspending coordination with the U.S. in Syria over so-called “de-confliction zones” after the downing of the Syrian jet.

NAVY SHOOTS DOWN SYRIAN WARPLANE

The United States and Russia, which has been providing air cover for Syria’s President Bashar Assad since 2015 in his offensive against ISIS, have a standing agreement that should prevent in-the-air incidents involving U.S. and Russian jets engaged in operations over Syria.

The Russian defense ministry said it viewed the incident as Washington’s “deliberate failure to make good on its commitments” under the de-confliction deal.’

IRAN STRIKES SYRIA OVER TEHRAN TERROR ATTACKS

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, in comments to Russian news agencies, compared the downing to “helping the terrorists that the U.S. is fighting against.”

“What is this, if not an act of aggression,” he asked.

Meanwhile, the U.S.-backed opposition fighters said Assad’s forces have been attacking their positions in the northern province of Raqqa and warned that if such attacks continue, the fighters will take action.

“Would just tell you that we’ll work diplomatically and militarily in the coming hours to establish deconfliction,” Dunford said.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and Jennifer Griffin and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Who is the ‘Islamic State’ leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi?

From domestic insurgent group to global terror organization, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has transformed the “Islamic State” into what it is today. Amid reports of his death, DW examines the life of the world’s most wanted man.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi Bildnis in Flammen (picture-alliance/AP Photo/M. Swarup)

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, born Ibrahim Awad Ibrahim Ali Mohammed al-Badri, rose to international notoriety in 2014 as the leader of the self-styled “Islamic State” (IS) militant group ravaging parts of Syria and Iraq.

On Friday, Russia’s defense ministry announced it conducted airstrikes in May that killed several leaders of the militant group, adding that al-Baghdadi may also have died during the assault.

While his adolescence is shrouded in narratives of piety and reticence, the rise of al-Baghdadi as one of the world’s most recognizable criminals has its notable beginning in the wake of the US invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Before the ‘Islamic State’

In response to the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, al-Baghdadi formed a militant group to join a growing insurgency against occupation.

In 2004, al-Baghdadi was detained by US forces and held in both the controversial Abu Ghraib and Camp Bucca detention centers. He reportedly spent more time in Abu Ghraib, an infamous facility known for torture committed by American forces in Iraq.

Al-Baghdadi was released later that year with a large group of low-level prisoners. Several media outlets have claimed that the militant leader had been held by US forces for much longer, however, these allegations have not been substantiated by government records.

In 2006, al-Baghdadi’s troop of insurgents joined others to form the Mujahideen Shura Council. The alliance of several Islamist militant groups later disbanded and formed an organization calling itself the Islamic State in Iraq, commonly referred to at the time as al Qaeda in Iraq.

Bildergalerie zum ARD Special über Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi IS AnführerPeople who knew al-Baghdadi have described him as an individual who clung to religious teachings in his youth

‘Global terrorist’

It is unclear how al-Baghdadi rose through the ranks of al Qaeda’s Iraqi division but in 2010, he was declared the leader of the Islamic State in Iraq following the assassination of Abu Omar al-Baghdadi (no relation), who led the group since its formation in 2006.

As the leader of al Qaeda in Iraq, al-Baghdadi was responsible for the group’s attacks in Baghdad and surrounding areas, which included high-profile suicide bombings targeting Iraqi security services and Shiites.

Following the death of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in May 2011, al-Baghdadi vowed reprisal attacks against the US and its allies in Iraq.

Read more: ‘Islamic State’ gold remains hard to trace

In October 2011, the US state department announced that al-Baghdadi, referring to him by his birth name al-Badri, had been deemed a “specially designated global terrorist.”

Since then, the US has maintained sanctions against him along with a multi-million-dollar reward for information leading to his capture or death.

Break with al Qaeda

In 2013, al-Baghdadi announced the Islamic State in Iraq’s expansion into Syria. He claimed that the Nusra Front, al Qaeda’s affiliate in Syria, had joined forces with his group, and as such, announced the creation of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (known variously as IS, ISIL, ISIS).

Read more: Raqqa: The human cost of degrading the ‘Islamic State’

Al-Baghdadi’s announcement that the Nusra Front had joined his group was contested by the organization’s leader, who appealed to al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri. Al-Zawahiri decreed that al-Baghdadi should remain in Iraq and not pursue activities in Syria, a decision al-Baghdadi effectively ignored and spelled the end of the Islamic State in Iraq’s allegiance to al Qaeda.

In January 2014, IS took control of Raqqa and expelled the Nusra Front from the Syrian city. The capture of Raqqa pushed al Qaeda to disavow IS in February, saying it “is not a brand of the al Qaeda group.”

From caliph to shadows

IS rose to notoriety in June 2014, when it launched a blitzkrieg campaign and captured large swathes of territory in Iraq and Syria, culminating in the ransacking and occupation of Mosul.

On June 29, speaking from a pulpit in the historic Great Mosque of Mosul, al-Baghdadi announced the creation of a worldwide caliphate and shorted the group’s name to Islamic State.

Read more: Mosul: the last stand for ‘Islamic State’ in Iraq

However, religious leaders, mainstream scholars of Islam and the wider Muslim community has repudiated the re-establishment of the Islamic institution and al-Baghdadi’s claim to be caliph.

Since the public announcement, al-Baghdadi has effectively drifted into the shadows of the so-called caliphate, where he continues to orchestrate the development and expansion of the militant group as a terror phenomenon that spans the globe. With his possible death still unconfirmed, it remains to be seen what impact this could have on the Islamic State.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi announced the creation of a worldwide caliphate from a historic mosque in Mosul, a city in which his duties as a top leader in al-Qaeda focused onAl-Baghdadi announced the creation of a worldwide caliphate from a historic mosque in Mosul

DW RECOMMENDS

Jihadi arrests in EU nearly double in 2 years: Europol

The number of people arrested in Europe on suspicion of jihadi activities has almost doubled in the last two years. Overall, there were 142 “failed, foiled or completed terrorist attacks” in 2016.

French soldiers patrol in front of the Eiffel Tower (Getty Images/AFP/B. Guay)

Europol, Europe’s top law-enforcement organization, said in its annual EU Terrorism Situation and Trend Report that 718 suspects were arrested on offenses relating to jihadi terror in 2016, up from 395 in 2014.

The number of attacks dropped from 17 in 2014 to 13 last year, six of which were linked to the so-called “Islamic State” (IS) group.

Armed police officers outside a rugby match at Twickenham in London. Lauren Hurley/PA Wire Security has been stepped up in the UK following recent attacks

The report noted that women and children, as well as young adults, were playing an increasingly important operational role.

One in four of those arrested in Britain in 2016 were women, an 18 percent increase from 2015, Europol said.

“Female militant jihadists in the West perceive fewer obstacles to playing an operative role in a terrorist attack than men, and successful or prevented attacks carried out by women in Western countries may act as an inspiration to others,” the report said.

In total 1,002 arrests were made in 2016 relating to terror activities. France had the highest number of arrest at 456, with almost a third of those detained 25 years or younger, Europol said.

There were 142 “failed, foiled or completed terrorist attacks” including those by jihadis, more than half of them in the UK.

Syria, Iraq as inspiration

Explosives mimicking those used in Syria and Iraq have become a leading threat to the EU, along with returning fighters, the report said.

The report noted that governments are paying close attention to the use of drone explosives by jihadi groups in Iraq, as homegrown extremists seek to replicate the weapons used there.

DW RECOMMENDS

Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Manchester and now another attack in London? European cities have been increasingly targeted by Islamist extremists in recent years. (04.06.2017)

The bomber who struck at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester last month, for example, used a backpack bomb packed with bearings and other small pieces of metal, similar to bombs used in attacks by al-Qaida and IS extremists.

The suicide bombing in  Manchester on May 22 killed 22 people. Two weeks later, a knife and van attack in central London left eight dead.

“The kind of attacks that ISIS have used in the conflict zone, including car bombs perhaps and others, if that technical capability is known within the organization then clearly there’s potential for that to be transferred into a European scenario,” Europol chief Rob Wainwright told The Associated Press, using an alternative acronym for IS.

“Although one shouldn’t underestimate, either, the difficulty in doing that on a consistent basis.”

Many Europeans have left IS after growing disenchanted with life under war, if not the brutality of the extremists themselves, Wainwright said.

The concern is how to distinguish them from others who are returning clandestinely to form new networks, he added.

“It’s a reflection of the very serious threat that we face in Europe and a reflection of the fact that I’m afraid we can’t get that threat down to zero,” Wainwright said.

Need for international cooperation

The report noted the need for closer cooperation in intelligence sharing among member states.

“Terrorists do not respect or recognize borders,” the EU’s safety chief Julian King said in the report. “In our resolve to defeat them we must draw on a newfound determination to work together, sharing information and expertise.”

Not all attacks were jihadi-inspired, with the majority of other attacks carried out by “ethno-nationalist” and separatists extremists. For example, dissident Republican groups in Northern Ireland were involved in 76 attacks, the report said. This lead to 123 arrests.

Watch video00:45

London attack suspect appeared in jihad doc

jbh/cmk (AFP, AP)

AUDIOS AND VIDEOS ON THE TOPIC

US-led coalition destroys pro-government forces within deconfliction zone in Syria – Pentagon

The US-led coalition inside Syria says that it has destroyed pro-government forces that entered the deconfliction zone established by the United States and Russia around a coalition training facility. The coalition last struck a pro-government convoy in the area on May 18.

The Coalition destroyed additional pro-Syrian regime forces that advanced inside the well-established deconfliction zone in southern Syria,” said a statement from the US Central Command.

The Coalition does not seek to fight Syrian regime or pro-regime forces but remains ready to defend themselves if pro-regime forces refuse to vacate the deconfliction zone.”

‘Threat to US partner forces’: US-led coalition airstrike targets pro-govt convoy in Syria https://on.rt.com/8c1s 

Photo published for US-led coalition confirms airstrike on pro-govt convoy in Syria citing 'threat to US partner...

US-led coalition confirms airstrike on pro-govt convoy in Syria citing ‘threat to US partner…

The US forces in Syria have bombed a militia group fighting alongside the Syrian government forces in southern Syria on Thursday, the US-led coalition has confirmed.

rt.com

The deconfliction zone, with a radius of about 55 km, was established around the town of At Tanf, where the US has set up base to train special forces for the final assault on the Islamic State stronghold of Raqqa.

Despite previous warnings, pro-regime forces entered the agreed-upon deconfliction zone with a tank, artillery, anti-aircraft weapons, armed technical vehicles and more than 60 soldiers posing a threat to the Coalition and partner forces based at the At Tanf Garrison,” said the CENTCOM statement. “The Coalition issued several warnings via the deconfliction line prior to destroying two artillery pieces, an anti-aircraft weapon, and damaging a tank.”

On May 18, the Coalition attacked a convoy of what the US called “Iranian-directed troops,” who were moving in the direction of the training base, which houses several hundred US staff.

The bombardment was condemned by Damascus, which has repeatedly accused Washington and its allies of operating within its sovereign territory, and Moscow, which according to media reports, had tried to prevent the escalation of the standoff, relaying messages between the two sides.

On Tuesday, Russia, once again, criticized the strike, and called for an extraordinary UN Security Council meeting.

“The strike is a step by the US towards engaging in an open conflict in Syria, and an act of aggression,” said a member of the defense and security council of the upper chamber of the Russian parliament, Frants Klintsevich.

The American attack occurred on the same day US-backed militias launched an all-out assault on Raqqa which has served as the Islamic State’s unofficial “capital” since its capture in 2014. Raqqa is located 300 km to the north of At Tanf.

The battle for the city, where up to 4,000 ISIS fighters are still thought to be holed up, is expected to be quicker than the siege of Mosul, where fighting still continues eight months after the initial assault began. The International Rescue Committee says that 200,000 civilians are still trapped in Raqqa.

Experts RT spoke to believe that in choosing to exercise pre-emptive force the US is not just defending its troops, but pursuing broader strategic goals.

“At Tanf is a potential flashpoint, and the reason the Americans have reacted so strongly, with a bombing, is because they believe they can make sure that the flashpoint doesn’t actually happen, that they can stifle it,” journalist Martin Jay said in an interview with RT from Beirut.

 “The US is trying to put all sorts of pressure on Syria to make sure that Damascus will be more flexible in what it will give up at the negotiating table. And basically, they want to change the Assad regime and make it more palatable to the Israelis, Saudis and their other allies,” Daoud Khairallah, Professor of International Law at Georgetown University, told RT.

Shiite militants push IS out of key Iraqi town of Baaj

The pro-Baghdad Popular Mobilization Forces have driven the “Islamic State” out of the Iraqi town of Baaj, cutting one of the group’s supply lines between Mosul and Syria. The Shiite fighters are endorsed by Iran.

Irak Angriffe auf IS-Militante am Rande von Al-Baaj (Reuters/Stringer)

DW RECOMMENDS

‘IS’ digs its heels in as Iraqi troops advance in Mosul

As the Iraqi army begins to surrounding them, the so-called “Islamic State” jihadist group has responded with a campaign of car bombs and sniper fire. Mosul was the terrorists’ last urban stronghold. (28.05.2017)

US more than doubles bounty for ‘Islamic State’ leader

Iraqi forces capture key bridge in push to liberate Mosul

Iraqi air force backed the militia’s push into the border town, the Popular Mobilization group announced on Sunday.

The victory over the self-styled “Islamic State” (IS) fighters was a “big and qualitative achievement” in the larger operation to retake the city of Mosul from the IS jihadis, said deputy chief of the Popular Mobilization Forces, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

The border town is located west of Mosul, and its loss cuts a key IS supply lines connecting the city with Syria. Baghdad’s troops launched the offensive to liberate Mosul eight months ago and uprooted the jihadi militia from several parts of the city. However, IS forces are still holding the western section of their last remaining urban stronghold in Iraq.

Iranian advisors active in Syria and Iraq

Despite the US backing, the anti-IS coalition was forced to slow down its efforts while facing car bombs and sniper fire in the densely populated areas of Mosul.

Karte Irak ENG

The retaking of Baaj comes several weeks after the Popular Mobilization Forces started their push to reclaim the area near the Syrian border. IS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is believed to be hiding in the region.

While the Shiite-dominated militia nominally answers to Baghdad, it is supported by the Shiite power Iran. Tehran provided training and military advisors to the Iraqi group, and also helped organize thousands of Shiite fighters from Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan in Syria.

dj/sms (dpa, AP, AFP, Reuters)

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