UN Shocked when Israeli PM reveals classified information about the Islamic Republic

During his speech at the UN General Assembly, Benjamin Netanyahu revealed highly classified intelligence information that shocked the intelligence community around the world.
Iran maintains its nuclear program to develop a nuclear bomb.
This is the result of the nuclear agreement of Obama and the European Union with Iran.
Iran’s rulers threaten to wipe Israel off the map, but European leaders do not care.
European countries have abandoned Israel, but Israel will defend itself by itself whether the EU and the UN like it or not.
Israel will never allow a regime that chants “Death to America” and “Death to Israel” to develop nuclear weapons.


The Islamic Republic of Iran left an empty seat during the speech of the Israeli Prime Minister at the UN General Assembly.
The Iranian regime is afraid of the truth.
Iran is the world’s leading state sponsor of terror.
Hamas, Hezbollah and Shiite militant groups in Yemen and Iraq are receiving an endless supply of weapons from Iran.
Iran also has one of the worst Human Rights Record in the world.
Under Sharia law in Iran:
– There is no freedom of religion or freedom of speech.
– There is no equality between people (the non-Muslim is not equal to the Muslim).
– There are no equal rights for men and women.– There is no democracy or a separation between religion and state politics.
Child marriage, forced marriage, Child brides, polygamy, FGM, Acid attacks, honor killings, beheading and stoning.
Sharia has no place in the civilized world.

The rulers of Iran vowed to destroy Israel “in the name of Islam.”
Every Friday prayer they shout “Death America, Death to Israel”.
The media is turning a blind eye to Iran’s threats to destroy Israel.
Every Western country must stand with Israel against radical Islamic terrorism.
Iran founded the Shiite terror organization Hezbollah in Lebanon with the declared aim of destroying Israel.
During the first and second Lebanon wars, Hezbollah fired tens of thousands of rockets at civilian communities in northern Israel.
The Israeli people face the frighteningening escalation of Islamic terror acts through Israel.

COURTESY: SPEECHPOINT

FED UP: Nikki Haley slams UN “inhumane regimes won’t lecture us about human rights”

WATCH: Nikki Haley Blasts UN Human Rights Council – Nikki Haley Slams Human Rights Council As UN’s ‘Biggest Failure’.
Enough is enough! Regimes that systematically violate human rights, won’t lecture The US and Israel about human rights.
Nikki Haley announced that the United States would be leaving the United Nations Human Rights Council. She says the Trump administration is fed up with its willingness to give membership to some of the world’s cruelest regimes and engage in blatant antisemitism.

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/CW3E0a0KhXo?rel=0&showinfo=0&start=39Britain, the US and Australia should stop funding the UN.
The U.N. General Assembly elected Qatar, Congo and Pakistan to its top human rights body, joining existing members such as Saudi Arabia, China, Cuba and Venezuela.

Countries that practice Sharia laws have been chosen to be human rights watchdogs.
Even a country like Iran has been given a seat in the UN Human Rights Council.
Iran Where women are stoned to death, where gays are executed in a public square.
Christians are brutally persecuted in the Islamic Republic of Iran.
Pastors are jailed for no reason, no reason other than for being Christian leaders. Christians have been lashed for sipping wine during prayer services; Christians have been brutally tortured for doing nothing more than practicing their faith.Saudi Arabia is the head of the Human Rights Council, a country where there are no Christian citizens, even Christian migrant workers are persecuted by the authorities if they practice their religion.
No religion is allowed to exist in Saudi Arabia except Islam, anyone who leaves Islam is executed.

Pakistan is the worst country for Christians to live in. Under sharia blasphemy law Muslims murder Christians on false charges of insulting the Prophet Muhammad and the Koran.

These countries are kidnapping the UN bodies to push the anti-Israel and anti-Western agenda.
They use the United Nations to attack Israel which is the only democratic state in the Middle East where Christians are free and women are not considered citizens in rank.

In the last two years Benjamin Netanyahu cut 90% of Israeli aid to the UN after U.N.’s Cultural Agency passed a resolution denying the Jewish and Christian connection to Jerusalem.
Western countries should follow Israel – Cut all funding & Announce Withdrawal From U.N.

COURTESY: SPEECHPOINT

Watch: UN stunned as Trump ends his speech by mentioning God, not Allah

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The UN General Assembly was shocked when Trump chose to end his speech by mentioning God.
This powerful and patriotic speech by President Trump provoked outrage among Liberals and Atheists who claim it was not “inclusive” enough.
He did not mention “Allah” he did not mention “atheism” he only referred to the Judeo-Christian values on which his great nation was founded.
Please watch the video and leave a comment below down: What do you think about this?

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/0p-nAGd1GJs?rel=0&showinfo=0&start=2040Britain, the US and Australia should stop funding the UN.
The U.N. General Assembly elected Qatar, Congo and Pakistan to its top human rights body, joining existing members such as Saudi Arabia, China, Cuba and Venezuela.

Countries that practice Sharia laws have been chosen to be human rights watchdogs.
Even a country like Iran has been given a seat in the UN Human Rights Council.
Iran Where women are stoned to death, where gays are executed in a public square.
Christians are brutally persecuted in the Islamic Republic of Iran.
Pastors are jailed for no reason, no reason other than for being Christian leaders. Christians have been lashed for sipping wine during prayer services; Christians have been brutally tortured for doing nothing more than practicing their faith.

Saudi Arabia is the head of the Human Rights Council, a country where there are no Christian citizens, even Christian migrant workers are persecuted by the authorities if they practice their religion.No religion is allowed to exist in Saudi Arabia except Islam, anyone who leaves Islam is executed.

Pakistan is the worst country for Christians to live in.
Under sharia blasphemy law Muslims murder Christians on false charges of insulting the Prophet Muhammad and the Koran.

These countries are kidnapping the UN bodies to push the anti-Israel and anti-Western agenda.
They use the United Nations to attack Israel which is the only democratic state in the Middle East where Christians are free and women are not considered citizens in rank.

In the last two years Benjamin Netanyahu cut 90% of Israeli aid to the UN after U.N.’s Cultural Agency passed a resolution denying the Jewish and Christian connection to Jerusalem.
Western countries should follow Israel – Cut all funding & Announce Withdrawal From U.N.

COURTESY: FREE SPEECH TIME

Trump addresses U.N., brags about his accomplishments, draws derisive laughter

The president condemned globalism, telling the international body the U.S. would protect its sovereignty and national interests.
by Jonathan Allen /  / Updated 
Image:

President Donald Trump addresses the 73rd session of the General Assembly at the United Nations on Sept. 25, 2018.Timothy A. Clary / AFP – Getty Images

President Donald Trump offered a broad condemnation of globalism at the United Nations on Tuesday, saying that the United States would protect its sovereignty and national interests — and that the other countries of the world should do the same.

“We reject the ideology of globalism and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism,” the president said during wide-ranging remarks that began with a stump-like recitation of his domestic accomplishments, included an announcement of new sanctions against Venezuela, and covered his reasons for pulling the U.S. out of the U.N. Human Rights Council and its global compact on migration.

“Migration should not be governed by an international body unaccountable to our own citizens,” Trump said.

Trump got off to an inauspicious start when he boasted about his presidency.

“In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country,” Trump said, eliciting laughter from some of those in attendance.

“Didn’t expect that reaction, but that’s OK,” he responded.

Later, he told reporters that his assessment of his administration’s success was supposed to be a laugh line.

“Oh it was great, that was meant to get some laughter,” he said. “But it was great.”

In aggrieved tones in his address, Trump accused foreign countries, including China, of cheating the United States in trade deals and taking advantage of American protection to keep down their own defense budgets. And Trump said the U.S. would provide financial assistance only to those nations that already are acting in America’s interests.

“The United States is the world’s largest giver in the world, by far, of foreign aid, but few give anything to us,” he said. “We will examine what is working, what is not working, and whether the countries who receive our dollars and our protection also have our interests at heart. Moving forward, we are only going to give foreign aid to those who respect us, and frankly, are our friends.”

A year after calling North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “little rocket man” from the U.N. lectern, Trump thanked Kim for working with the U.S. to return American hostages and the remains of soldiers killed in the Korean conflict. But, he said, U.S. sanctions on North Korea “will stay in place until denuclearization occurs.”

The president also threatened that “the United States will respond” if chemical weapons are used in Syria, bashed Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and detailed U.S. efforts to ramp up sanctions on Iran after he withdrew America from a nuclear agreement with Tehran.

In an exchange with reporters after his speech, Trump expressed hope that the U.S. relationship with Iran could eventually follow the same trajectory as its relationship with North Korea — where the prospect of sanctions relief has led Pyongyang to discuss ending its nuclear program.

COURTESY: NEWS

Remembering Kofi Annan: A smooth negotiator

Kofi Annan has died at the age of 80. For 10 years, he was at the forefront of world politics. He continued to work as an ambassador for peace even after leaving his post as secretary-general of the United Nations.

    
Kofi Annan addresses a news conference at the United Nations in Geneva

Kofi Annan — a small man with a grey goatee, smiling from behind his desk in New York — once recalled that his first day as United Nation’s secretary-general was like his first day at school.

He was born into a prominent family in 1938 in Kumasi, the second biggest city in Ghana. His father was governor of Ashanti province under British colonial rule. Annan attended top schools in Ghana, Switzerland and later in the US.

Picture-perfect UN career

Annan joined the UN at the age of 24, first working as an administrator at the World Health Organization and then becoming head of personnel for the UN mission in Cairo, deputy director of the UNHCR in Geneva and eventually deputy UN secretary-general. In 1993, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali nominated him under-secretary-general for peacekeeping, putting him in charge of 75,000 peacekeepers around the world.

As the head of UN peacekeeping troops, Annan experienced the first real dent in his career in 1994 when radical Hutu militias killed over 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in what later became known as the Rwandan genocide. Annan was accused of failing to provide adequate support in the east African country despite the prior warnings of a violent escalation by Romeo Dallaire, the head of the UN peacekeepers in Rwanda. His reluctance was partly due to the fact that the US and Europe seemed to have little interest in getting more involved in Rwanda.

Annan expressed regret on behalf of the UN 10 years later: “The international community failed Rwanda, and that must leave us always with a sense of bitter regret and abiding sorrow.”

Untiring peace negotiator

The Rwandan genocide didn’t put an end to Kofi Annan’s upward movement in the UN. He was elected secretary-general in December 1997, after some pressure from the US, and thus became the first person from sub-Saharan Africa to occupy the post.

Read more: Choosing the next UN chief is ‘intensely political’

In his opening speech, he made it clear that he not only wanted to carry out administrative tasks at the head of the UN but also wanted to shape global politics. His agenda included the fight against global poverty, global warming, and AIDS, and the resolution of political crises. Later, he described the signing of the Millennium Development Goals in 2000 as a highlight of his period in office. He also acted as a negotiator in the Cyprus conflict and with Iran over its nuclear program. Annan was also an outspoken critic of the attacks by the Sudanese Janjaweed militia in the Darfur region.

In 2001, the Norwegian Nobel Committee recognized Annan’s contributions, awarding both him and the UN with the Nobel Peace Prize. The chairman of the Oslo-based panel, Gunnar Berge, told DW in an interview that Kofi Annan was “an excellent representative of the United Nations and probably the most effective secretary-general in its history.”

Once again, the modesty for which Annan was so respected shone through in his acceptance speech: “This award belongs not just to me. I do not stand here alone. On behalf of my colleagues in every part of the United Nations, in every corner of the globe, who have devoted their lives — and in many instances risked or given their lives in the cause of peace — I thank the Members of the Nobel Prize Committee for this high honor.”

Failed reformer

Despite this public appreciation, Kofi Annan began to lose support from the members of the United Nations. Over his tenure as secretary-general, he tried in vain to reform the body, telling the General Assembly, “We must also adapt international institutions, through which states govern together, to the realities of the new era. We must form coalitions for change, often with partners well beyond the precincts of officialdom.” In the end, a plan to give other countries, especially those in Africa, Asia and South America, seats on the Security Council failed largely because of resistance from the US and the body’s other permanent members.

A man holds a banner against Annan (Reuters/W. Lone)Annan has been a controversial leader. His leadership of a 2017 commission examining Rohingya violence raised criticism.

Annan also came under pressure for his stance against the US invasion of Iraq under President George W. Bush in 2003, which he said violated the UN’s Charter. He tried to prevent military intervention with a round of negotiations.

In 2004, the UN secretary-general faced calls to resign over an embezzlement scandal concerning the UN’s Oil-for-Food program. There were revelations that Kofi Annan’s son Kojo had accepted payments from a Swiss company that the UN had commissioned to monitor goods supplies as part of the program. An investigative committee absolved Kofi Annan in 2005, stating that he was neither in control of his family nor of the UN.

Special representative in Syrian war

Annan stepped down as UN secretary-general in 2006 at the end of his second period in office. He did not retire entirely from the public eye, however, and went on to publish his memoirs and work for various NGOs, including his own Kofi Annan Foundation for the promotion of global governance.

Annan speaks against the backdrop the WEF logo (REUTERS)Annan visited the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2011

He also acted as a negotiator between the government and the opposition in Kenya after post-election violence broke out at the end of 2007. In February 2012, he was named special representative in the Syrian civil war. He stepped down six months later after several failed attempts to negotiate a ceasefire.

Later, as violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar’s Rakhine state grew in 2017, Annan headed an expert commission that looked into how the conflict could be resolved.

Kofi Annan is survived by his second wife, Nane Lagergren, with whom he lived in Geneva, and a son and daughter from his first marriage.

Watch video02:49

DW correspondent Dagmar Wittek on the death of Kofi Annan

COURTESY: DW

UN human rights chief says Security Council members risk UN’s survival

The outgoing UN human rights chief has said the five permanent members wield too much power as they can veto resolutions even in cases of alleged injustices. Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein has been outspoken during his term.

    
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein (L) speaks during a press conference.

Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, the outgoing UN human rights chief, warned on Monday that the world body could “collapse” if the imbalance caused by the excessive powers wielded by the Security Council’s five permanent members is not changed.

“There’s a feeling within the UN that there is a sort of pentarchy – the P5 (permanent members) running too much of the business at the expense of the organization itself,” Zeid said in reference to the US, Russia, China, France and the UK.

Zeid was alluding to the countries’ ability to veto resolutions in cases like alleged injustices in Syria’s war or by Israeli forces against Palestinians.

“When they cooperate things can move, when they don’t, everything becomes stuck and the organization in general becomes so marginal to the resolution of these sorts of horrific conflicts that we’ve seen,” he said. “And I think that has to change. In the end the organization can collapse at great cost to the international community.”

Outspoken critic

Zeid has been an outspoken critic of leaders across the world, including US President Donald Trump.

Washington, on the other hand, has been critical of Zeid for unfairly targeting the Israeli government.

“There is a sense that the permanent five have created a logjam by dint of their proclivity to use the veto, and the paralysis — less so the UK and France — but of course, the US, Russia and China quite frequently,” Zeid said on Monday in a discussion with journalists in his office.

Zeid told reporters earlier this month that he did not seek a new four-year term as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights because he did not believe the US, China, and Russia would support him.

Zeid, whose term ends on August 31, will be succeeded by former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet.

ap/jm (Reuters, AP, AFP)

Each evening at 1830 UTC, DW’s editors send out a selection of the day’s hard news and quality feature journalism. You can sign up to receive it directly here.

COURTESY: DW

Kofi Annan, Former United Nations Secretary-General, Dies at 80

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning diplomat reshaped the organization as a champion of human rights




Mr. Annan before a meeting at his office at the United Nations offices in Geneva.


Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the first black African to lead the U.N., died Saturday at age 80.


Alongside Liberian politician Ellen Johnson, left, and Algeria’s Lakhdar Brahimi, Mr. Annan attends the Elders walk in Johannesburg to celebrate Nelson Mandela’s 100th Anniversary on July 18.


Mr. Annan, who was a Nobel Peace Prize-winning diplomat, speaks at the White House after meeting President Bill Clinton in January 1997.


Mr. Annan with Former French President Jacques Chirac in Paris in 2008.


Mr. Annan consoles family members of victims of a massacre by pro-Indonesia militia in Liquica, East Timor, in 2000.


Mr. Annan with rock star and "Make Poverty History" organizer Bob Geldof, center, and U2 lead singer Bono for a session of the G-8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland, in 2005.


Mr. Annan as U.N.-Arab League mediator listening to a reporter's question during a news conference in Geneva in August 2012.


Mr. Annan, inspects an army base south of Stockholm with Swedish Defense Minister Bjoern von Sydow in 1997.


In 1997, Opera great Luciano Pavarotti pays a courtesy visit to Mr. Annan.


Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Mr. Annan and other members of the Elders group at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow in 2015.
Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the first black African to lead the U.N., died Saturday at age 80.
I-IMAGES/ZUMA PRESS
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Kofi Annan, the Nobel Peace Prize-winning diplomat who rose through the ranks of the United Nations to become its first black African secretary-general and reshape the organization as a proponent of human rights, died Saturday at the age of 80.

Mr. Annan’s family confirmed his death from a short, unspecified illness, in a statement from his foundation.

Known for his cool manner, noble posture and charismatic personality, Mr. Annan served as the U.N.’s leader for two five-year terms, from January 1997 to December 2006. He campaigned to protect people everywhere from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, though his tenure was also clouded by allegations of corruption and bribery within the organization.

Kofi Annan

@KofiAnnan

It is with immense sadness that the Annan family and the Kofi Annan Foundation announce that Kofi Annan, former Secretary General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Laureate, passed away peacefully on Saturday 18th August after a short illness…

From 1993 to 1997, Mr. Annan served as the head of the U.N.’s peacekeeping operations, a period that saw the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, during which about 800,000 people were killed, and the massacre of around 8,000 Bosnian Muslims by Bosnian Serbs in Srebrenica in 1995. Mr. Annan later said he should, and could, have done more to raise the alarm and galvanize support from member nations. That regret led him to focus acutely on the plight of marginalized people around the world.

He had a keen influence on many of the crises of recent decades, from the HIV/AIDS pandemic to the Iraq War and had a strong hand in making the world’s tragedies the responsibility of the organization.

Mr. Annan overhauled and revitalized the U.N., creating an organization much more deeply involved in peacekeeping efforts and alleviating poverty around the globe. An ardent human rights advocate, he championed development in the developing world and especially his home continent of Africa. Mr. Annan established the U.N.’s Peacebuilding Commission and the Human Rights Council.

“Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world,” the Kofi Annan Foundation said in a statement.

“It is with profound sadness that I learned of his passing,” said U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in a statement. “In many ways, Kofi Annan was the United Nations. He rose through the ranks to lead the organization into the new millennium with matchless dignity and determination.”

Kofi Atta Annan was born along with his twin sister Efua Atta, in Kumasi, a city in southern Ghana, on April 8, 1938.

He earned a degree in economics from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn., in 1961, joining the U.N. the following year as an administrative and budget officer at World Health Organization in Geneva. A decade later, he graduated with a master’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management.

In 1965, Mr. Annan married Titi Alakija, with whom he had two children. They divorced in 1983, and a year later he remarried, to Swedish lawyer Nane Marie Lagergren, who had a daughter from a previous marriage.

He served as the Economic Commissioner for Africa in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva, and various roles in New York before being appointed as the U.N.’s seventh secretary-general in 1997.

In 1998, Mr. Annan negotiated directly with Saddam Hussein in Baghdad over U.N. weapons inspections. Though the diplomatic mission was successful, he faced backlash for shaking hands and smoking cigars with Mr. Hussein.

Mr. Annan again became embroiled in scandal in 2004, when his son, Kojo Annan, was implicated in a scandal surrounding a U.N. humanitarian program in Iraq, known as “oil for food.” The program, which allowed Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine, and other humanitarian items, was exploited by Mr. Hussein, due to lax oversight at the U.N. headquarters.

A commission eventually exonerated Mr. Annan, but found that he hadn’t done enough to investigate once he was made aware of the situation.

Mr. Annan and the U.N. were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001 for revitalizing the organization and prioritizing human rights.

He is survived by a wife and three children.

Write to Alexandra Wexler at alexandra.wexler@wsj.com

COURTESY: LAT