France’s Emmanuel Macron outlines vision for Franco-German alliance

French President Macron has said boosting cooperation with Germany was crucial to regaining the trust of European voters. His comments came ahead of his first EU leaders summit in Brussels.

Frankreich Wahlen Macron (picture alliance/AP Photo/T.Camus)

French President Emmanuel Macron on Thursday called on Germany to work alongside France in fostering a fresh approach to European politics and winning back the trust of people feeling disenfranchised by the EU.

Speaking to a number of European newspapers ahead of his first EU leader summit in Brussels on Thursday, Macron said the greatest threat facing the bloc was the propensity for lawmakers and voters to veer away from liberal policies.

Read more: Opinion: Europe, En Marche!

“The question now is: will Europe succeed in defending the deep values it brought to the world for decades, or will it be wiped out by the rise in illiberal democracies and authoritarian regimes,” he said.

Watch video01:17

Let The Reform Begin

The French president called on Germany and France to drive the necessary reforms needed to reconcile citizens with the European project. Macron’s policy roadmap would see the EU promote “greater economic and social wellbeing” and introduce tighter rules on workers and make it harder for companies to employ low-wage labor from eastern Europe.

“One country’s strength cannot feed on the weakness of others,” Macron told reporters. The French president insisted that German Chancellor Angela Merkel was in total agreement and realized the need for deeper cooperation. “Germany, which underwent a series of reforms around 15 years ago, is realizing that this isn’t viable,” he said.

Doubts remain over new eurozone ministry

One area where Macron’s vision has drawn skepticism in Berlin concerns the euro currency. The French president has called for a common eurozone budget and a democratically controlled “Euro Ministry.”

Reports last month suggested that the proposal had been rejected in Berlin by German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble.

Read more: Macron’s EU ideals meet Merkel’s mastery

However, Macron insisted on Thursday that it was the “only means of achieving more convergence within the eurozone,” and that “Germany does not it deny it.”

On Tuesday, Merkel signaled that she would be open to the idea of a eurozone budget.

“We could, of course, consider a common finance minister, if the conditions are right,” the chancellor said in a speech at the annual congress held by Germany’s largest industrial lobby, the Federation of German Industries. However, Merkel ruled out any European body taking responsibility for member states’ risks and liabilities for debt.

Watch video25:59

Victory for Macron – Challenge for Europe?

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World leaders mourn loss of Helmut Kohl

World leaders are paying tribute to former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who has died at the age of 87. The EU’s Jean-Claude Juncker said flags would fly at half-staff in Brussels to honor a “great European.”

Watch video05:04

Angela Merkel pays tribute to Helmut Kohl

The news of Helmut Kohl’s death, which broke on Friday, triggered a wave of responses from politicians around the world, expressing sadness at the passing of the leader credited with reunifying Germany.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said Kohl “was a great European and a great friend.”

Helmut’s death hurts me deeply. My mentor, my friend, the very essence of Europe, he will be greatly, greatly missed http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_STATEMENT-17-1680_de.htm 

Flags at European institutions would be flying at half-staff as a tribute to the man who “filled the European house with life.”

‘A rock – both steady and strong’

Former US President George H. W. Bush, who cooperated with Kohl and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to reunite East and West Germany at the end of the Cold War, also mourned Kohl’s death.

Bush described Kohl as “a true friend of freedom,” saying he considered him “one of the greatest leaders in post-war Europe.”

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Former Chancellor Helmut Kohl has died, aged 87. Having led Germany for 16 years, he is remembered for reuniting the country as well as for making a huge political and economic contribution to the integration of Europe. (16.06.2017)

“Working closely with my very good friend […] will remain one of the greatest joys of my life. Throughout our endeavors, Helmut was a rock – both steady and strong,” Bush said Friday.

Kohl had spoken to his biographers at length about his friendship with Bush, whom he met while the American was still serving as vice president under Ronald Reagan.

Gorbachev, the last leader of the USSR, said Kohl was an “outstanding person” whose impact on world history would stand the test of time.

According to Gorbachev, the former German chancellor “would be noted in the chronicles of our time not only because of his personal qualities, but also because he found himself at the helm of his country during a time of unprecedented turmoil” including the fall of the Berlin Wall.

“In such cases, a lot depends on the people taking decisions. It was very fortunate that the leading countries, at the time, had statesmen with a sense of responsibility […] capable of reaching through the barrier of suspicion towards partnership and trust.”

German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel also praised Kohl as a “great statesman,” and lauded his legacy of helping Europe grow closer.

“A great German has died,” Gabriel said.

Watch video07:48

Helmut Kohl, German patriot and European

Merkel lauds her CDU predecessor’s foresight

German Chancellor Angela Merkel was on a diplomatic visit to Rome when the death of Kohl, a Roman Catholic, was made public. She described her mentor as a “stroke of luck” for Germany.

“Helmut Kohl decisively influenced the course of my life, too,” she said in Italy.

Her spokesman Steffen Seibert responded to the news on Twitter, saying Berlin was “deeply mourning” the death of the conservative politician.

Russian President Vladimir Putin sent his condolences to Merkel and German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, mourning the passing of “one of the patriarchs of European and global politics.”

“I was fortunate to personally meet Helmut Kohl. I was honestly amazed by his wisdom, his ability to take thought-out, far-sighted decisions even in the most complex of situations. In Russia, he will be remembered as a principled advocate of friendly relations between our countries,” Putin said.

French President Emmanuel Macron posted a German language tweet praising Kohl for paving the road to “united Germany and German-French friendship,” showing a renowned image of Kohl standing side-by-side with the late French President Francois Mitterrand. The two leaders were in Verdun marking the 70th anniversary of the start of World War I.

Wegbereiter des vereinten Deutschlands und der deutsch-französischen Freundschaft: Mit Helmut Kohl verlieren wir einen sehr großen Europäer.

President Steinmeier said Kohl was an “exceptional politician” with a “strong character.”

“He was deeply convinced that Europe was our destiny,” Steinmeier said.

Meanwhile, Merkel’s Social Democratic challenger in this year’s German federal election, Martin Schulz, said that despite their political differences, Kohl deserved “respect and recognition” for his accomplishments.

“Helmut Kohl was the chancellor of German reunification; in 1989 it was thanks to his spirit, his political courage and his leadership that the restoration of German unity was made possible,” Schulz said. “Kohl’s vision of a European Germany, which guided this great statesman in the reunification just as much as the Treaty of Maastricht, is a legacy to the German nation and to all of Europe.”

Even Germany’s Left party, the spiritual successor to the East German communists, said that Friday’s focus should be on “mourning a great European.” The party leaders hinted that Kohl’s tenure was more productive than that of his successors Gerhard Schröder and Merkel. He embodied German reunification, they said, “even if the course he set led to severe social upheaval in eastern Germany.”

‘Prepared Europe for 21st century’

Helmut Kohl remains the longest serving German chancellor, from 1982 to 1998. Kohl’s successor in the chancellery, Gerhard Schröder, praised Kohl as a German patriot.

“Even though we led a tough election battle in 1998 and differed on many political issues, I have the greatest respect for his historic efforts,” Schröder said.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu described Kohl as a “friend of Israel” who was “fully committed” to the security of the Jewish state.

British Prime Minister Theresa May called the German politician “a giant of European history.”

“We have lost the father of modern Germany,” she said in a statement.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres also mourned Kohl as a “personal friend” and praised his historic role in uniting Germany, according to his spokesman Stephane Dujarric. The UN chief served as Portuguese prime minister between 1995 and 2002.

European Council President Donald Tusk and NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg also posted their reactions online.

I will always remember Helmut Kohl. A friend and a statesman who helped reunite Europe.

Helmut Kohl was the embodiment of a united Germany in a united Europe. When the Berlin Wall fell, he rose to the occasion. A true European.

US President Donald Trump hailed the former German chancellor as a “friend and ally of the United States.”

In a statement released by the White House, Trump said: “He was not only the father of German reunification, but also an advocate for Europe and the transatlantic relationship. The world has benefited from his vision and efforts.”

Former US President Bill Clinton said Kohl’s “visionary leadership prepared Germany and all of Europe for the 21st century.”

“I will never forget walking with him through the Brandenburg Gate in 1994 for a large rally on the eastern side, and seeing genuine hope in the eyes of tens of thousands of young people,” he said. “I knew at that moment that Helmut Kohl was the man who could help them realize their dreams. History continues to prove that he delivered.”

Watch video05:21

DW studios in Berlin, Washington on Kohl’s death

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Angela Merkel announces temporary halt on Afghan deportations after Kabul bombing

A deadly blast in Kabul this week reignited the debate on deporting refugees from Germany to war-torn Afghanistan. The chancellor has now temporarily halted expulsions for all except criminals and security threats.

Watch video00:20

Merkel: ‘Voluntary returns and deportation of criminals will continue’

Germany will temporarily suspend deportations to Afghanistan after a deadly bombing in Kabul this week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Thursday.

Commenting on the massive blast that killed at least 90 people in downtown Kabul, Merkel said it was time to reassess the security situation in the country.

Federal and state governments agreed on a suspension of deportations to Afghanistan until a further security assessment by the foreign ministry, Merkel said in Berlin, adding that the suspension would most likely continue until July.

Pending the new assessment, Germany will continue to promote voluntary return and would keep deporting criminal offenders and threats to security on a case by case basis, Merkel said.

The attack was a reason to “take another proper look” at Afghanistan, with the German Foreign Ministry examining the threats “province by province.”

Read: Afghanistan: sent back to a war zone

Many German politicians have long argued that Merkel’s government was not justified in sending refugees back to Afghanistan due to safety concerns.  The argument escalated after the latest attack in the heavily guarded diplomatic heart of Kabul. In response, the German Green Party on Thursday launched a parliamentary motion to halt the deportations. The largest opposition party in the German parliament, the Left Party, derided deportations as “inhumane.”

As the news of the Wednesday attack broke, Germany was preparing to send a plane full of refugees back to Kabul. The plane was delayed, with Berlin explaining that German diplomats in Kabul were too preoccupied with the blast to deal with the returnees.

However, German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said that the flight would be rescheduled as soon as possible.

Failed Afghan asylum seekers board a plane that will take them back to Afghanistan (picture-alliance/dpa/D. Maurer)Germany has sent several plane loads of failed asylum seekers in a controversial series of deportations

Earlier, Joachim Herrmann, interior minister in the German state of Bavaria, had told the media that it was still “feasible” to return the refugees to Afghanistan.

“The latest attack in Kabul was terrible,” he told newspapers of the Funke Mediengruppe. “But we don’t have to stop the deportations because of it.”

Read: Types of protection in Germany for asylum seekers

Watch video01:39

A would be suicide bomber shares his story

No place is safe

Merkel’s main rival in the upcoming parliamentary elections, Martin Schulz, had urged for a halt to deportations at least until the assessment is complete.

“In the light of what happened yesterday, I don’t think we should be deporting anymore,” he said, speaking at a forum organized by the German public broadcaster WDR.

A defense policy expert for Schulz’s SPD party, Rainer Arnold, agreed that deportations were “not responsible” at this moment.

“There is no place in that country where people can live safely,” he told the Passauer Neue Presse newspaper.

Between December and March, Germany deported 92 Afghan nationals on several charter flights to Kabul.

aw, dj/rt (Reuters, dpa, AFP, KNA)

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Frau Merkel, you might not like Herr Trump but you need him

John Moody

Here’s some unsolicited advice for German Chancellor Angela Merkel: Achtung!

Merkel’s uncalled-for remarks about the United States no longer being a trustworthy partner for its European allies set off a frenzy. Was she so displeased with President Trump during last week’s G-7 meeting? Was their discourse so strident that she thought a verbal warning shot was necessary?

Or is she just trying to keep her job?

Remember, Germany has federal elections scheduled for September, and Merkel, while slightly ahead in most polls, has no sure lock on keeping her party, the Christian Democrats, in the majority. A strong, though receding surge for Socialist Martin Schulz, and a newly energized far-right party, the Alternative for Germany, has squeezed the chancellor, who has been in power since 2005.

But Merkel’s horrible decision to open the gates of Europe to tens of thousands of refugees from the Middle East and Africa turned her own people against her. Only Germany’s robust economy has saved her from humiliation in the last round of local elections – often an indicator of how federal elections will turn out.

Since she invited migrants into her country, and forced her neighbors to do the same, Europe has suffered nearly a dozen major terror attacks, none more horrific than the December 2016 Christmas market truck massacre in Berlin, which killed 12 and left Germany feeling very exposed to lone-wolf Islamic horror.

And who was among the first to decry Merkel’s come-one, come-all policy? Donald Trump. Who spoke up about the lopsided trade deficit the United States has with Germany? Donald Trump. Who lectured European members of NATO – specifically Germany – about not paying its fair share for the continent’s defense. Same answer.

Among her European counterparts, Merkel is used to being treated with deference. Germany is really the economic engine for the entire continent, and the only country willing to shell out its own resources to bail out the ne’er-do-wells like Greece, who have become addicted to free money.

When the United Kingdom opted out of the European Union last June, Merkel took it as a personal affront and has since schemed to make the U.K. pay a heavy price for its willfulness.

You might not like Mr. Trump, Frau Merkel. He is rude and outspoken and typically, in your view, American. But remember: Russia is to your east. Vladimir Putin is not impressed with the paltry defense force Europe could put together, if it did not have the United States behind it.

Verstehen?

John Moody is Executive Vice President, Executive Editor for Fox News. A former Rome bureau chief for Time magazine, he is the author of four books including “Pope John Paul II : Biography.

Obama in Berlin for landmark church assembly

Former US President Barack Obama addressed the church congress saying “we can not hide behind a wall.” This year, the 500th anniversary of the Reformation is the featured topic, with many big names making an appearance.

Watch video02:55

Merkel, Obama debate faith and politics

Former US President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke in front of tens of thousands of people before the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on Thursday to discuss God, faith and the state of the world.

Speaking on a panel on the first day of Germany’s Protestant Church Assembly, Obama praised Merkel’s “outstanding work” and described her as one of his “favorite partners” during his eight years in office. He lauded Merkel’s handling of the refugee crisis, while at the same time reflected that he “didn’t always have the tools” to end the war in Syria.

“Despite our best efforts, there is a vicious war,” Obama said.

The former US president warned of succumbing to nationalism and a closed world – an apparent reference to US President Donald Trump.

Reports: Obama warned Trump about Flynn’s Russian ties

Obama makes first public speech since leaving office

“In this new world we live in, we can’t isolate ourselves, we can’t hide behind a wall,” he said before the gate that once separated East and West Berlin.

Obama has made few appearances since leaving office. He said he spent time with his family, working on his foundation for youth and catching up on lost sleep.

Obama is the most famous guest among the approximately 140,000 expected participants at the four-day “Kirchentag.”

It is a star-studded occasion: 2,500 events, 30,000 contributors and guests from all over the world celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and the Protestant culture of debate.

More than 100,000 worshippers attended three open-air services on Wednesday evening in central Berlin to mark the start of the Protestant gathering.

Those attending include Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba, Grand Imam of Cairo’s Al-Azhar Mosque Sheik Ahmed el-Tayyib, philanthropist Melinda Gates, German singer and songwriter Max Giesinger, German climate change researcher Ottmar Edenhofer, UN envoy Staffan de Mistura and Israeli author Amos Oz.

A new movement

The German Protestant Church Assembly, or “Kirchentag,” which has been held every two years since 1949, is an international and yet typically German event at the same time. It was founded by the East Prussian politician Reinold von Thadden, a member of the Confessing Church, which opposed the Nazi regime. Von Thadden was active in the resistance during the Nazi era and later acted as president of Kirchentag until 1964.

“Apart from the Confessing Church branch, the Protestant Church did not play a laudable role in National Socialism,” says Protestant Church Assembly spokesperson Sirkka Jendis. “That is why dedicated lay people said, ‘We need to create a forum to help ensure that something like that cannot happen again.'”

From the “Protestant Week” in Hanover in 1949 emerged a Protestant lay movement that deliberately set itself apart from the official church and held regular congresses. “The broad scope and public relevance is unique,” says Jendis. In view of the numerous panels on subjects including the flight of refugees, migration, war, tolerance and integration, she says it is clear to her that, “this Church Assembly may become political.”

Reinold von Thadden-Trieglaff (picture-alliance/dpa)Von Thadden launched ‘Kirchentag’ in post-war Germany

Controversial guests

Current Protestant government leaders in Germany will participate in this year’s congress: German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble will discuss what is holding Europe together, the Social Democratic Party’s (SPD) chancellor candidate Martin Schulz will talk about credibility and German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier will take part in the holiday church service in Wittenberg.

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere’s whirlwind participation will see him make seven Kirchentag appearances, including one together with Al-Azhar’s Sheik Ahmed el-Tayyib. “I think it is great that he is coming to join the discussion,” de Maiziere told the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit. “Controversial guests like him are a gain for the Church Assembly.”

But Protestant debate culture also has its limits. There was great opposition to the invitation of 43-year-old Anette Schultner, the national spokesperson of “Christians in the AfD,” a Christian organization of the Alternative for Germany (AfD), a right-wing populist political party. She wants to explain to visitors why their faith and their membership in the AfD are compatible with each other.

Watch video02:21

DW exclusive with Heinrich Bedford-Strohm, Head of the Protestant Church in Germany

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Theresa May turns combative ahead of Brexit negotiations

Days after waxing lyrical about the “special relationship” between the UK and the EU, the British premier has hardened her tone. The change came after Angela Merkel said the UK was suffering illusions over its future.

Großbritannien Wahlkampf Theresa May (picture-alliance/dpa/PA Wire/A. Devlin)

British Prime Minister Theresa May on Thursday accused European Union member states of lining up to oppose Britain ahead of the release of the EU’s negotiating position on Brexit.

“We’ve seen from Chancellor Merkel today, we’ve heard her comments today. We’ve seen that actually there will be times when these negotiations are going to get tough,” May was quoted as saying by the BBC while speaking at a campaign rally in the Labour stronghold of Leeds ahead of the snap general election she called for June.

“Our opponents are already seeking to disrupt those negotiations – at the same time as 27 other European countries line up to oppose us,” she said.

“That approach can only mean one thing – uncertainty and instability, bringing grave risk to our growing economy with higher taxes, fewer jobs, more waste and more debt,”

May’s combative comments came just days after dining with EU Brexit negotiators and saying the UK had a “commitment to achieving a deep and special partnership with the European Union.”

British illusions

May was responding to German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s warning to the UK on Thursday against “illusions” over the exit process.

Merkel stressed in parliament that “a third-party state will not have the same rights or even superior rights to a member state,” referring to the relationship the EU has with non-EU countries such Switzerland and Norway.

“This may sound self-evident, but I have to say this clearly because some in Britain seem to have illusions on this point,” she said. “That would be a waste of time.”

Watch video00:25

Merkel’s statement on Brexit

EU presents unified front

EU ministers met in Luxembourg on Thursday to underscore their unity ahead of Saturday’s meeting to approve their negotiation position.

“It seems that at the moment we are completely united on everything,” said Vice Premier Louis Grech of Malta, the country that holds the rotating EU presidency. “Naturally we have to protect the EU’s interests.”

He said a prime objective was “to ensure that we will conduct the negotiations in a spirit of unity and trust between the 27.”

The EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, said that “we are united.”

Saturday’s EU’s guidelines will inform a tight negotiating mandate for Barnier which should be ready by May 22.

60 billion euro bill

The EU is expected to push on issues such as the treatment of EU expats, the bill of remaining costs to be paid by Britain and border issues in Ireland.

Some reports claim the EU could hold Britain liable for costs until at least a year after it leaves, at a possible cost of 60 billion euros (US$65 billion).

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson responded angrily to those claims.

“If you’re saying that they want the money before they get any substantive talks, then that is obviously not going to happen,” he told the BBC.

Northern Ireland

Ireland was expected to push for automatic membership of Northern Ireland to the EU if the two ever reunified.

German daily “Frankfurter Allgemeine” reported on Thursday that rental payments from the EU medicines agency in London could also become a sticking point in negotiations.  The lease agreement of the EU authority was reportedly signed until 2039, according to a document from the European Parliament, and could cost 347.6 million euros. Various EU members are seeking to be the new home of the institution.

Negotiations will likely start after Britain’s June 8 election, in which May is seeking to crush a weakened Labour party.

Watch video26:00

Nigel Farage on Conflict Zone

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Merkel awarded Elie Wiesel Prize for preservation of Holocaust memory

Chancellor Merkel has been awarded the Holocaust Memorial Museum’s highest honor for her help preserving memories of the Holocaust. She visited Buchenwald concentration camp with the man after whom the award was named.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a wreath laying ceremony during her visit to the concentration camp Dachau (picture-alliance/AP Photo/K. Joensson)

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel was honored on Monday by the Holocaust Memorial Museum in the US for her contributions to Holocaust memory and education.

She was awarded the Elie Wiesel Prize – the highest award given by the museum.

The museum said it gave the award for her “unwavering commitment to making the preservation of Holocaust memory a priority for Germany.”

“When the museum was facing staunch opposition in its effort to open the largest closed Holocaust archive in the world, the International Tracing Service, Chancellor Merkel changed her government’s policy and sent her justice minister to the museum to announce Germany’s support for opening the archives, thereby enabling thousands of survivors and their families to discover for the first time the fate of loved ones,” the museum said in a statement.

“The Chancellor has supported the creation and strengthening of Holocaust-related institutions in Germany which have become among the museum’s most important partners. She has repeatedly and vigorously condemned all manifestations of antisemitism.

“Her visit to Buchenwald with the museum’s founding chairman Elie Wiesel in 2009 was symbolic of the many efforts that have been made by Germany to confront its past.”

Merkel thanked the museum for the award, saying in a video message “We owe it to the victims who went through immeasurable suffering to explore these deepest recesses of our being,” referencing a quote by Wiesel.

German ambassador to the US Peter Wittig accepted the award on her behalf in Washington.

I am honored to have accepted the Elie Wiesel Award, the highest honor of @HolocaustMuseum, on behalf of Chancellor Angela Merkel tonight

Merkel said the award was a “major gesture” of ties between US Holocaust memorial efforts and Germany that was not to be taken for granted.

Merkel said that for Germany to have a bright future, it was essential to understand the Holocaust as “the ultimate betrayal of all civilized values.”

Holocaust survivor Eli Wiesel listens to US President George W. Bush at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington (picture-alliance/dpa/Brack Pool)Holocaust survivor Eli Wiesel was a tireless human rights campaigner

Elie Wiesel was a Holocaust survivor and the founding chairman of the museum. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986  He died last year.

The museum has awarded the prize since 2011 to recognize “internationally prominent individuals whose actions have advanced the museum’s vision of a world where people confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity.”

April 24 was Holocaust Remembrance Day, known as Yom Hashoah. It marked the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

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