Florida students call for gun control: ‘Without action, children die’

After 17 of their classmates and coaches were killed, the teens at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are making their voices heard. They want politicians to finally start taking action.

USA Anti-Waffen-Demonstration in Fort Lauderdale (Reuters/J. Drake)

The students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas (MSD) High School in Parkland, Florida, have lived through a nightmare. On Wednesday, February 14, a gunman opened fire at their school, killing 17 people. The teens who survived were witness to classmates and teachers being shot. Now some of the survivors are taking action.

They are using their personal experience to try to convince politicians to pass gun control measures and to call out those who are unwilling to discuss the issue.

To the politicians saying this isn’t about guns, and that we shouldn’t be discussing this rn:

We were literally being shot at while trying to gain an education. So this is about guns. You weren’t in the school while this was happening. We were, and we’re demanding change.

The Valentine’s Day shooting in Parkland was the 18th shooting at an educational institution in the US in 2018. The number includes suicides and incidents where no one was injured.

The fact that shootings happen so frequently is making many Americans angry at their government and the National Rifle Association (NRA) for creating an environment in which even the smallest gun control proposals come up against fierce resistance. At an anti-gun rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Saturday, MSD student Emma Gonzalez gave voice to the anger she and her classmates felt.

“If all our government and our president can do is send ‘thoughts and prayers,’ then it’s time for victims to be the change we need to see,” Gonzalez said. “We, we are going to be the kids that you read about in textbooks…We are going to be the last mass shooting.”

‘This shouldn’t be happening anymore’

One MSD student named Carly emphasized on Twitter that guns should be at the center of the discussion about what happened at her school. Carly’s tweet came as a reply to conservative talk show host Tomi Lahren, who had tweeted that the Left was trying to “push their anti-gun and anti-gunowner agenda.”

I was hiding in a closet for 2 hours. It was about guns. You weren’t there, you don’t know how it felt. Guns give these disgusting people the ability to kill other human beings. This IS about guns and this is about all the people who had their life abruptly ended because of guns. https://twitter.com/tomilahren/status/963978544295505922 

“Blood is being spilled on the floors of American classrooms and that is not acceptable,” MSD senior David Hogg told the Washington Post.

Hogg and a group of students ended up hiding in a closet during the shooting, where Hogg started interviewing his classmates and taping their opinions on gun control with his phone. He said he didn’t know whether anyone in the closet would survive, but that he hoped his footage would spur action if it was found.

One of the students Hogg recorded is Isabelle Robinson.

“I really don’t think there’s anything new to say, but there shouldn’t have to be,” Robinson said in the video. “If you looked around in this closet and saw everyone just hiding together, you would know that this shouldn’t be happening anymore.”

Watch video02:12

Florida shooting survivors call for tougher gun laws

In an interview with CNN, Hogg said he believed there was something seriously wrong with his country.

“Some of our policy makers, they need to look in the mirror and take some action,” Hogg said. “Because ideas are great, but without action, ideas stay ideas and children die.”

The voice of their generation

Sergio Rozenblat, the father of a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, said on TV channel MSNBC that he wished someone “would film these kids and then show it to the politicians with their speeches, their empty speeches.”

In the days of smartphones and social media, however, no one needs to film the students – they are making sure that pundits are not just talking about them, but that they, the survivors, are part of the conversation.

MSD student Kyra wrote on Twitter that she and her classmates were going to be “the voice of this generation” despite their grief. They were going to make their voices heard, she said.

despite having our hearts ripped out of our chests. Despite losing our friends and coaches. Despite living through a nightmare. As students of Douglas, we are the voice of this generation. And I’ll be damned if anyone thinks they can silence us.

With 14 students and three faculty members dead, the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas high school is among the deadliest school shootings in modern US history. In 1999, two students at Columbine High School in Colorado took the lives of 13 people before killing themselves. In 2012, a shooter killed 20 children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut before fatally shooting himself in the head.

MSD students are old enough to remember the Sandy Hook massacre. One student named Isabel pointed out on Twitter that because gun control wasn’t tightened after Sandy Hook, she and her fellow MSD students are now “left traumatized.”

in sixth grade, i made paper snowflakes and wrote messages on them for the children of sandy hook. today, in 11th grade, i am left traumatized. because to politicians, guns are more important than the lives of my classmates.

But this time, maybe things will change. The students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas are old enough to voice their opinions, organize and put a lot of pressure on politicians. They have technology at their fingertips to make themselves heard, that the victims of the Columbine massacre, for example, didn’t have. And they are determined to fight the powerful gun lobby in the United States and get tougher laws on who can buy firearms, so that no other students will have to experience what they went through.

COURTESY: DW

After the tragedy in Florida, Trump struggles to show his empathetic side

After the tragedy in Florida, Trump struggles to show his empathetic side
President Trump pauses Thursday before speaking about the mass shooting at a Florida high school. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

 

There was a moment in President Trump’s speech Thursday about the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla., when his voice seemed to catch for just a moment as he conjured up a picture of parents kissing their children goodbye, sending them off to school for the last time.

“Each person who was stolen from us yesterday had a full life ahead of them,” he said, his voice faltering for a split-second, “a life filled with wondrous beauty and unlimited potential and promise.”

Given Trump’s otherwise stoic air, it was unclear whether he was stumbling over the words on his teleprompter or displaying emotion. His shoulders slumped heavily as he walked away from the podium, but that may have reflected the uncomfortable questions about gun control that reporters were shouting at him at the time.

Either way, the moment was notable mainly for its low-key nature, by contrast with Trump’s public response to other crises. His emotions run conspicuously high when he is angry or indignant — which has often been the case with crimes in which the alleged perpetrator comes from another country.

Every new president requires time to ease into the role of helping the nation through joys and sorrows. Whether in triumph or tragedy, the country has a need for displays of sensitivity and strength from its elected leader. No prior role serves as proper preparation, according to those who have watched previous presidents grapple with the challenge.

Trump struggles more than most to display responses other than presidential anger and outrage.

“The country needs the president to lead them through that dark moment,” said Joshua DuBois, a Pentecostal minister who advised President Obama through many crises. “But before we can do that, we need to know the president understands.”

“In a moment like this,” he said, “a president has to be willing to let his heart break.”

That ability has led to memorable moments of presidential leadership in the past: Ronald Reagan promising that Americans would never forget the Challenger astronauts nor the last glimpse of them as they “slipped the surly bonds of Earth to touch the face of God”; President George W. Bush climbing atop the rubble of the Sept. 11 attacks with a bullhorn; President Obama weeping over the death of schoolchildren at Sandy Hook Elementary School and singing “Amazing Grace” with survivors of a church massacre in Charleston, S.C.

Each of them, however, had rocky early days. Obama came off as aloof. Reagan could be stiff as both of the presidents Bush could be awkward.

Trump, by contrast, often barges in with guns blazing. When an Uzbek man was named as the suspect in the killing of eight people on a New York City bicycle path, Trump fired back with promises of a major crackdown on immigration. Two days after the terror attack in San Bernardino, he threatened a response to terrorists so tough it would get him “in trouble.”

Survivors say that bombastic responses aren’t helpful. They’d rather see the president come to town, pay tribute to victims and offer hope that things will get better.

Obama did that in tragedy after tragedy. Still, it was a piercing wound to some in Oak Creek, Wis., when he failed to visit a Sikh gurdwara immediately after a white supremacist massacred worshipers there. The Obama team’s response was otherwise strong, Sikh activist Valarie Kaur said at the time, but the president failed in the role only the chief executive can play.

“After the attack we endured, Sikh Americans, and all brown and black people in America for that matter, need our president to directly show the nation that we belong here,” she wrote.

Trump’s White House has started to get a stronger feel for how details of the president’s schedule are perceived in the wake of a tragedy. The White House shut down public appearances in the immediate aftermath of the Parkland shooting and canceled a Friday trip to Orlando. Trump’s political operation said he would also cancel a campaign trip to Pennsylvania that would likely have coincided with funerals in Florida.

In putting the president’s Thursday address together, his speech writing team crafted a message of sympathy that focused on the victims and survivors. It hit the same notes as previous presidents in promising federal support for state and local officials dealing with the aftermath.

The address angered some listeners who hoped that the deaths of schoolchildren might inspire Trump to consider changes to the nation’s gun laws. The gunman at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mowed down 17 people with a semiautomatic AR-15, the same kind of gun used to kill 20 first-graders at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. In the six years since that massacre, there have been at least 239 shootings at schools across the country, wounding 438 people and taking the lives of 138.

As little as Trump reveals a softer side to the public, the few times he has done so have involved children. When he declared the opioid crisis to be a public health emergency, he spoke tenderly of the “beautiful, beautiful babies” he wanted to protect. “No child of God should ever suffer such horror,” he said of Syrian children suffering a chemical attack by forces loyal to the country’s leader, Bashar Assad.

“To every parent, teacher and child who is hurting so badly, we are here for you — whatever you need, whatever we can do, to ease your pain,” he said in his remarks Thursday. “We are all joined together as one American family, and your suffering is our burden also.”

Those words were appropriate, said DuBois, but still fell short.

“I do not sense vulnerability from him, and I did not hear real solutions,” he said. “That’s the barrier I believe he’ll have to overcome.”

Twitter: @cparsons

Courtesy: L A Times

Plenty of warnings in Florida school shooting suspect’s past, but ‘we missed the signs’

Special Report: Florida investigators update on deadly school shooting
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Former classmates of the suspect in Wednesday’s deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school say they weren’t surprised to discover he was the alleged gunman, but a Broward County commissioner admits officials “missed the signs.”

“I can’t say I was shocked,” Joshua Charo, a 16-year-old student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., told the Miami Herald. “From past experiences, he seemed like the kind of kid who would do something like this.”

“I think everyone had in their minds if anybody was going to do it, it was going to be him,” Dakota Mutchler, a 17-year-old junior at the school, told the Associated Press.

“A lot of people were saying it was going to be him,” Eddie Bonilla, another student, told CBS Miami. “A lot of kids joked around like that, saying that he was going to be the one to shoot up the school. But it turns out everyone predicted it.”

Police say the 19-year-old suspect, Nikolas Cruz, killed 17 people and wounded at least a dozen others in the rampage. Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel told reporters that Cruz had been expelled from the school for “disciplinary reasons.” Israel said that an “AR-15-style weapon” and “countless magazines” were recovered at the scene. According to the Associated Press, Cruz purchased the weapon legally about a year ago.

“All he would talk about is guns, knives and hunting,” Charo said. “He used to tell me he would shoot rats with his BB gun and he wanted this kind of gun, and how he liked to always shoot for practice.”

Mutchler said Cruz often boasted on Instagram about killing animals and that “he started progressively getting a little more weird.”

“He was that weird kid that you see,” Daniel Huerfano, another former classmate, told the AP. “Like a loner.”

Nikolas Cruz’s booking photo. (Photo: Broward County Jail via AP)
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On Thursday, President Trump seemed to suggest that the community failed to report the warning signs to authorities.

“So many signs that the Florida shooter was mentally disturbed, even expelled from school for bad and erratic behavior,” the president tweeted. “Neighbors and classmates knew he was a big problem. Must always report such instances to authorities, again and again!”

Broward County Commissioner Beam Furr admitted as much in an interview with NPR.

“We missed the signs,” Furr said. “We should have seen some of the signs.”

Furr told CNN that Cruz had been receiving treatment at a mental health clinic, but stopped going about a year ago.

“It wasn’t like there wasn’t concern for him,” Furr said. “We try to keep our eyes out on those kids who aren’t connected.”

Parents wait for news after reports of a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday. (Photo: Joel Auerbach/AP)
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“Most teachers try to steer them toward some kind of connections,” he added. “In this case, we didn’t find a way to connect with this kid.”

Broward County Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie told reporters on Wednesday afternoon that he did not know of any threats posed by Cruz to the school.

“Typically you see in these situations that there potentially could have been signs out there,” Runcie said. “I would be speculating at this point if there were, but we didn’t have any warnings. There weren’t any phone calls or threats that we know of that were made.”

But Jim Gard, a math teacher at the school, told the Miami Herald that administrators had identified Cruz as a potential threat.

Gard remembered that the school administration had previously sent out an email warning teachers about Cruz.

“We were told last year that he wasn’t allowed on campus with a backpack on him,” Gard said. “There were problems with him last year threatening students, and I guess he was asked to leave campus.”

Israel said that investigators reviewing Cruz’s social media accounts found “disturbing” images of him brandishing weapons.

Police evacuate students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday. (Photo: Mike Stocker/ South Florida Sun-Sentinel)
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At a press conference on Thursday morning, Israel urged the public to report changes in behavior to law enforcement.

“Don’t think about it. Call us,” Israel said. “If there’s something in your gut that tells you, ‘Something’s not right with this person — this person has the capabilities in my mind to do this or do that,’ please don’t remain silent.”

According to BuzzFeed, at least one person appears to have reported Cruz to authorities.

The site reports that in September, YouTube user Ben Bennight alerted the FBI that a commenter had posted an alarming remark on one of his videos.

“I’m going to be a professional school shooter,” wrote the commenter, named Nikolas Cruz.

According to Bennight, FBI agents conducted an in-person interview with him the following day.

“They came to my office the next morning and asked me if I knew anything about the person,” Bennight said. “I didn’t. They took a copy of the screenshot and that was the last I heard from them.”

View from inside Florida high school during attack

A chilling look inside a Florida high school as a shooter attacked on Wednesday, February 14.

Courtesy: Yahoo News

Terrifying footage from inside Florida school shooting (VIDEO)

Terrifying footage from inside Florida school shooting (VIDEO)
Chilling footage shared by a student from inside the Florida high school where 17 people have been killed and many more injured, reveals the terrifying shots that rang out to spine-chilling screams.

Student Matthew Walker posted a video on Snapchat as he and his classmates hid on the floor of a classroom inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where a former student opened fire on Wednesday.

In the footage, several shots can be heard ringing out near where the students are hiding, and smoke, supposedly from the firearm, starts to fill the classroom while students scream in fear.

A photo posted shortly after the footage was uploaded shows bullet holes in a laptop computer that was sitting on one of the desks in the classroom.

READ MORE: Mass shooting in Florida school leaves at least 14 victims, fatalities reported

Walker later reassured his followers on the video-sharing app that he was okay and feeling “very blessed to be alive”.

The attack took place shortly before the end of the school day in Parkland, a town about 45 miles north of Miami. Hundreds of panicked students fled the building and emergency services crowded the campus.

There are numerous fatalities. It’s a horrific situation,” said Broward County Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie to reporters.

The suspected gunman, 19-year-old former student Nikolas Cruz, surrendered to police quietly, according to Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel.

Courtesy: RT

‘I’m Not a Racist,’ Trump Says in Denying Vulgar Comment

Photo

President Trump speaking to reporters on Sunday as he arrived for dinner with Representative Kevin McCarthy, the majority leader, at Trump International Golf Club in Florida. “I’m the least racist person you will ever interview, that I can tell you,” Mr. Trump said. CreditAl Drago for The New York Times

PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump declared on Sunday night that he was “not a racist” and insisted that the derogatory comment attributed to him during an Oval Office meeting on immigration last week did not occur.

“I’m not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed, that I can tell you,” Mr. Trump said as he arrived at Trump International Golf Club for dinner with Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the majority leader.

Asked about the comments he was reported to have made, including a reference to African nations as “shithole countries,” Mr. Trump indicated that he did not say what had been attributed to him.

“Did you see what various senators in the room said about my comments? They weren’t made,” Mr. Trump said, referring to two Republican senators who said on Sunday morning talk shows that the president never made, or that they did not hear, racist comments about Africa and Haiti.

Asked about whether he still expects to reach a deal to extend protections for immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, Mr. Trump blamed Democrats for refusing to negotiate in good faith over the program known as DACA.

Continue reading the main story

“Honestly, I don’t think the Democrats want to make a deal,” he said. “I think they talk about DACA but they don’t want to help the DACA people.”

Mr. Trump said there were “a lot of sticking points, but they are all Democratic sticking points.”

“They don’t want security at the border, there are people pouring in,” the president added. “They don’t want security at the border, they don’t want to stop the drugs.”

“And they want to take money away from our military, which we will not do.”

Mr. Trump said he hoped there would not be a shutdown of the government over what he said was Democratic unwillingness to compromise on DACA.

“I don’t know if there is going to be a shutdown,” he said. “There shouldn’t be, because if there is, our military gets hurt very badly. We cannot let our military be hurt.”

Speaking to reporters for about three minutes as he entered his golf club, the president made his first comments on the mistaken alert sent to Hawaii residents on Saturday warning that a ballistic missile attack was imminent.

The president said that the mistake was “a state thing,” but that “we are going to now get involved in that.” He declined to answer a question about what the federal government would do to try to make sure that a mistaken alert like the one in Hawaii is not sent out again.

“I love that they took responsibility,” he said of the state officials in Hawaii. “They took total responsibility. But we are going to get involved. Their attitude and their — I think it is terrific. They took responsibility. They made a mistake.”

“We hope it won’t happen again,” he said. “Part of it is people are on edge, but maybe eventually we will solve the problem so they won’t have to be so on edge.”

Mr. Trump repeated his earlier criticism on Twitter of a Wall Street Journal report that he had boasted of a close relationship with Kim Jong-un, the North Korean dictator.

“The Wall Street Journal, as you know, quoted it totally wrong,” he said.

Asked about resolving the North Korea threat, Mr. Trump said: “They have got a couple of meetings scheduled, couple of additional meetings scheduled. We’re going to see what happens. Hopefully, it’s all going to work out.”

“We have great talks going on, the Olympics you know about. A lot of things can happen,” the president said, referring to talks between North Korea and South Korea, including conversations about the North Koreans’ attending the coming Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Courtesy: The New York Times

Foreign Buyers Drive Record $153 Billion of U.S. Residential Sales, Miami Top Market

Foreign Buyers Drive Record $153 Billion of U.S. Residential Sales, Miami Top Market

Dollar Volume Surges 49 Percent Annually, Florida, California, Texas Top Target States 

The National Association of Realtors is reporting that a substantial increase in sales dollar volume from Canadian buyers, foreign investment in U.S. residential real estate skyrocketed to a new record-high, as property transactions grew in each of the top five countries where buyers originated.

This is according to an annual survey of residential purchases from international buyers released this week by the National Association of Realtors, which also revealed that nearly half of all foreign sales were in three states: Florida, California and Texas.

NAR’s 2017 Profile of International Activity in U.S. Residential Real Estate, found that between April 2016 and March 2017, foreign buyers and recent immigrants purchased $153.0 billion of residential property, which is a 49 percent jump from 2016 ($102.6 billion) and surpasses 2015 ($103.9 billion) as the new survey high. Overall, 284,455 U.S. properties were bought by foreign buyers (up 32 percent from 2016), and purchases accounted for 10 percent of the dollar volume of existing-home sales (7 percent in 2016).

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for lawrence-yun.jpg

Lawrence Yun

“The political and economic uncertainty both here and abroad did not deter foreigners from exponentially ramping up their purchases of U.S. property over the past year,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist. “While the strengthening of the U.S. dollar in relation to other currencies and steadfast home-price growth made buying a home more expensive in many areas, foreigners increasingly acted on their beliefs that the U.S. is a safe and secure place to live, work and invest.”

Although China maintained its top position in sales dollar volume for the fourth straight year, the significant rise in foreign investment in the survey came from a massive hike in activity from Canadian buyers. After dipping in the 2016 survey to $8.9 billion in sales ($11.2 billion in 2015), transactions from Canadians this year totaled $19.0 billion – a new high for Canada.

Yun attributes this notable rise in activity to Canadians opting to buy property in U.S. markets that are expensive but still more affordable than in their native land. While much of the U.S. continues to see fast price growth, home price gains in many cities in Canada have been steeper, especially in Vancouver and Toronto.

“Inventory shortages continue to drive up U.S. home values, but prices in five countries, including Canada, experienced even quicker appreciation,” said Yun. “Some of the acceleration in foreign purchases over the past year appears to come from the combination of more affordable property choices in the U.S. and foreigners deciding to buy now knowing that any further weakening of their local currency against the dollar will make buying more expensive in the future.”

Foreign buyers typically paid $302,290, which was a 9.0 percent increase from the median sales price in the 2016 survey ($277,380) and above the sales price of all existing homes sold during the same period ($235,792). Approximately10 percent of foreign buyers paid over $1 million, and 44 percent of transactions were all-cash purchases (50 percent in 2016).

Foreign sales rise in top five countries; three states account for nearly half of all purchases

Buyers from China exceeded all countries by dollar volume of sales at $31.7 billion, which was up from last year’s survey ($27.3 billion) and topped 2015 ($28.6 billion) as the new survey high. Chinese buyers also purchased the most housing units for the third consecutive year (40,572; up from 29,195 in 2016).

Rounding out the top five, the sales dollar volume from buyers in Canada ($19.0 billion), the United Kingdom ($9.5 billion), Mexico ($9.3 billion) and India ($7.8 billion) all increased from their levels one year ago.

This year’s survey once again revealed that foreign buying activity is mostly confined to three states, as Florida (22 percent), California (12 percent) and Texas (12 percent) maintained their position as the top destinations for foreigners, followed by New Jersey and Arizona (each at 4 percent). Florida was the most popular state for Canadian buyers, Chinese buyers mostly chose California, and Texas was the preferred state for Mexican buyers.

Sales to resident foreigners and non-residents each reach new peak

The upswing in foreign investment came from both recent immigrants and non-resident foreign buyers as each increased substantially to new highs. Sales to foreigners residing in the U.S. reached $78.1 billion (up 32 percent from 2016) and non-resident foreign sales spiked to $74.9 billion (up 72 percent from 2016).

“Although non-resident foreign purchases climbed over the past year, it appears much of the activity occurred during the second half of 2016,” said Yun. “Realtors in some markets are reporting that the effect of tighter regulations on capital outflows in China and weaker currencies in Canada and the U.K. have somewhat cooled non-resident foreign buyer interest in early 2017.”

Looking ahead, Yun believes the gradually expanding U.S. and global economies should keep foreign buyer demand at a robust level. However, it remains to be seen if both the shortage of homes for sale and economic and political headwinds end up curbing sales activity to foreigners.

“Stricter foreign government regulations and the current uncertainty on policy surrounding U.S. immigration and international trade policy could very well lead to a slowdown in foreign investment,” said Yun.

NAR-2017-International-Profile-Infographic.jpg

COURTESY: WORLD PROPERTY JOURNAL

6 dead at Florida nursing home due to intense heat, loss of power after Irma

More than 100 people were evacuated from a Florida nursing home Wednesday after six people were reported dead at the Hollywood facility, whose residents were suffering from intense heat caused by a lack of electricity after deadly Hurricane Irma swept through.

Irma may have moved on from Florida, but lingering dangers caused by the storm, including carbon monoxide poisoning and heat-related incidents caused by a lack of air conditioning, remain in the Sunshine State, as millions wait for power to be restored.

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Officials in Hollywood said at least six people died and 115 people were evacuated from Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, located about 20 miles north of Miami.

“We’re conducting a criminal investigation inside,” Hollywood Police Chief Tom Sanchez said. “We believe at this time they may be related to the loss of power in the storm. We’re conducting a criminal investigation, not ruling anything out at this time.”

Sanchez said investigators believe the deaths were heat-related, adding it was a “sad event.”

Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief confirmed three people were pronounced dead at the facility. City officials said three additional people later died at the hospital.

The Hollywood Police and Hollywood Fire Rescue received a call around 4 a.m. at the facility, and found “several patients in varying degrees of medical distress,” city officials said.

Sanchez said officers have been assigned to check 42 assisted living facilities and nursing homes in Hollywood to “make sure they are in sufficient care of the elderly.”

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The nursing home did have a generator, but it is unclear if the generator was functional, WSVN reported.

Temperatures in Hollywood were expected to be around 86degrees on Wednesday — but feel about 10 degrees warmer.

A caseworker named Ed, who declined to give his last name, came to the facility Wednesday morning to check on his 80-year-old dementia patient. He told Fox News he isn’t sure yet if she’s one of the dead.

“I’m very concerned. I’m like a family member to her,” he said.

Meanwhile, in Central Florida, three people were found dead inside an Orlando home Tuesday from apparent carbon monoxide poisoning, officials said.

Orange County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Jeff Williams told The Associated Press a deputy responded to the the home following a 911 call from what sounded like a juvenile. The deputy was overcome by fumes while approaching the home and called for fire rescue.

Firefighters discovered two people dead inside the house, FOX35 Orlando reported. Another person, who tried to get out of the home, was found dead on the front lawn, while four others from inside the home were taken to a nearby hospital. Rescue workers found a portable gasoline generator running inside the home.

Further north in Daytona Beach, police said one person died and three others were being treated at a hospital Wednesday for carbon monoxide poisoning from an electric generator.

The Daytona Beach Fire Department said on Twitter a generator had been running inside the home.

A neighbor told FOX35 Orlando generators were not allowed in the community, and officials across Florida are warning people to keep generators outside homes.

Carbon monoxide from a generator is also suspected in the death of a man in Miami, while authorities say another dozen people were treated for carbon monoxide-related illnesses on Tuesday in Polk and Brevard counties.

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One Miami-area apartment building was evacuated Tuesday after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe for elderly tenants, while officers arrived at another retirement community to help people stranded on upper floors who didn’t have access to working elevators.

Elsewhere, a South Florida townhouse that weathered the storm was gutted by fire when power was restored, which caused the stove to ignite items left on the cooktop.

The number of deaths blamed on Irma in Florida climbed to 13 with the carbon monoxide deaths, in addition to four in South Carolina and two in Georgia. At least 37 people were killed in the Caribbean.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do, but everybody’s going to come together,” Florida Gov. Rick Scott said. “We’re going to get this state rebuilt.”

The number of people without electricity in the steamy late-summer heat dropped to 9.5 million — just under half of Florida’s population. Utility officials warned it could take 10 days or more for power to be fully restored. About 110,000 people remained in shelters across the state.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Courtesy, Fox News

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